Monthly Archive: May 2015

Growing Entrepreneurs through 4-H Gardens

Garden-based education is taking America by storm. While this is concept dates as far back as the seventeenth century, it certainly feels like the popular movement of the day. 4-H has been using garden based education since 1902 with tomato and corn clubs to teach life skills such as resiliency, planning and organizing, and communication. …

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“From Seed to Plate” – Youth Enjoy the Fruits of Their Labor

Did you know that something as simple as a garden can help youth not only learn to love vegetables, but also improve their science scores?  Fifth-graders at Port St. Joe and Wewahitchka Elementary Schools experienced the benefits of gardening this year through the 4-H Seed to Plate Program.  This program teaches youth how to plant, maintain, and harvest a …

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4-H Volunteer Grows Confidence through Gardening Project

Mary, Mary quite contrary, how does your garden grow? With 4-H volunteers, Essential Elements of Positive Youth Development, and UF IFAS Extension all in a row! School gardens have become the perfect avenue to implement experiential learning. They provide the students with a safe environment which fosters cooperative learning, and focuses on nurturing the essential …

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Make Your Own Seed-starter Pots From Newspaper!

4-H literally got its roots in gardening (pardon the pun). The very first 4-H Clubs focused on growing tomatoes and corn, and many youth and volunteers still enjoy gardening projects today. Gardening enriches your life, promotes good health, and saves money. One way to save money is to make your own paper pots to start your seeds. They …

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Growing Gardens with 4-H Clubs and Schools

Research shows that gardening in school and clubs positively influences youth environmental attitudes, nutritional attitudes, self-esteem, test scores, school attitudes, interpersonal skills, social concerns and behavior. For example, students in third and fifth-grade who learn science through gardening scored higher than students who did not learn science through the use of a garden (National Gardening …

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