Mosquito Control in Your Landscape

 

A natural disaster such as Hurricane Michael can cause excess standing water which leads nuisance mosquito populations to greatly increase. Floodwater mosquitoes lay their eggs in the moist soil. Amazingly, the eggs survive even when the soil dries out. When the eggs in soil once again have consistent moisture, they hatch! One female mosquito may lay up to 200 eggs per batch . Standing water should be reduced as mush as possible to prevent mosquitoes from developing.

You should protect yourself by using an insect repellant (following all label instructions) with any of these active ingredients or using one of the other strategies:

  • DEET
  • Picaridin
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus
  • Para-menthane diol
  • IR3535
  • An alternative is to wear long-sleeved shirts and pants – although that’s tough in our hot weather
  • Wear clothing that is pre-treated with permethrin or apply a permethrin product to your clothes, but not your skin!
  • Avoid getting bitten while you sleep by choosing a place with air conditioning or screens on windows and doors or sleep under a mosquito bed net.

Now let’s talk about mosquito control in your own landscape.

Let’s first explore what kind of environment in your landscape and around your home is friendly to the proliferation of mosquitoes. Adult mosquitoes lay their eggs on or very near water that is still or stagnant. That is because the larvae live in the water but have to come to the surface regularly to breeze. The small delicate larvae need the water surface to be still in order to surface and breathe. Water that is continually moving or flowing inhibits mosquito populations.

Look around your home and landscape for these possible sites of still water that can be excellent mosquito breeding grounds:

  • bird baths
  • potted plant saucers
  • pet dishes
  • old tires
  • ponds
  • roof gutters
  • tarps over boats or recreational vehicles
  • rain barrels (screen mesh over the opening will prevent females from laying their eggs)
  • bromeliads (they hold water in their central cup or leaf axils)
  • any other structure that will hold even a small amount of water (I even had them on a heating mat in a greenhouse that had very shallow puddles of water!)

You may want to rid yourself of some of these sources of standing water or empty them every three to four days. What if you have bromeliads, a pond or some other standing water and you want to keep them and yet control mosquitoes? There is an environmentally responsible solution. Some bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis ssp. israelensis or Bacillus sphaericus, only infects mosquitoes and other close relatives like gnats and blackflies and is harmless to all other organisms. Look for products on the market that contain this bacteria.

 

For more information:

Mosquito Repellents

UF/IFAS Mosquito Information Website

 

What is that Web in my Tree ?

What is that Web in my Tree ?

Bare limb tips and clusters of webbing in pecan trees are often the first sign that fall is right around the corner.

This webbing is caused by clusters of the larvae of the Fall Webworm (Hyphantria cunea (Drury)) which is often also called Pecan Webworm. “Fall Webworm” is a bit of a misnomer in our region since they are able to strike in spring and summer thanks to our long growing season. They are most noticeable in the fall thanks to cumulative effects of earlier feeding.

The adult form of the fall webworm is a solid white or white and brown spotted moth that emerges in late March through August in southern climates. After mating they lay orderly clusters of green eggs, usually May through August. Soon after emergence, the larvae begin creating silk webs to protect themselves as they voraciously feed on their various host plants, of which Pecan is most common in Northwest Florida gardens.

Although they are capable of defoliating complete trees, especially smaller ones, most seasons they are kept in check by beneficial insects such as the paper wasp. It is beneficial for small orchards or home growers to scout their trees from June through August. If small webs are observed in young trees, it is best to prune them out with a pole saw or pole pruner and dispose of the branch. Pruning of small branches does not harm the tree, but it may be of no benefit to remove small webs in larger trees, if they are being controlled by natural enemies.

Most home gardens don’t have a practical ability to spray for this insect. For homeowners it is difficult to spray for control, due to the cost of the equipment required to get the spray into the tree canopy. If spraying is an option, many insecticides containing spinosad or Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) exist. Both of these products target caterpillars while not harming beneficial insect predators that feed on these worm populations. Several more toxic insecticide products exist that will control fall webworm, but they often exacerbate insect problems by killing off beneficial insects that might be controlling other insect pests.

Fall webworm is not usually a serious problem for home gardens. Let natural enemies take care of the problem in most cases.

Supplemental Material:

Insect Management in Pecans

Learn more about the fall webworm’s life cycle at the UF/IFAS Entomology Department’s Featured Creature website.

Perdue University: Fall Webworms

Cicada Killers In The Summer

Cicada Killers In The Summer

Burrow made by the female Cicada killer. Photo Credits: Beth Bolles, Horticulture Agent

During the summer months, landscapes are alive with insect activity.  The majority of insects found in home landscapes are not harmful, although the sight of a few may cause some concern.  One insect appears to be threatening but is not is the cicada killer, the largest wasp in Florida.

During the warmer months, female cicada killers make ground burrows that consist of several cells for raising a few young.  There is an entrance hole, which often remains open, surrounded by a small mound of soil on one side of the entrance.   The female makes this ground burrow after mating and then captures cicadas to add to the individual cells.  The cicadas will serve as food for the developing wasp larvae that emerge from laid eggs.

Although the females are able to sting, they are not overly aggressive wasps.  The males do make more aggressive flights around people but are unable to sting.   When enjoying your landscape, just be aware of ground burrows and the flight of the female wasps into the burrows.  If you are lucky, you may even see a wasp with a cicada in tow.

Cicada killers should not be treated in most landscapes.  If you are unable to tolerate the wasps, you may reduce their habitat by covering open sandy areas with mulch or a groundcover.  This does not completely prevent their ability to nest but will certainly reduce suitable nesting spots.  For more information on cicada killers visit:  http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/in573.

 

This article is being revisited as part of our ‘Best Of’ series. August, 2012.

Growing Squash in the Home Garden

Are you interested in growing squash in your garden?  Do you know the difference between summer squash and winter squash?  Check out this very informative instructional video on growing squash in your home garden by Walton County Agriculture Agent Evan Anderson.

 

 

Caterpillars That Sting are in Northwest Florida

Caterpillars That Sting are in Northwest Florida

Saddleback Caterpillar. Image Credit: Matthew Orwat UF / IFAS

Did you know we have caterpillars that sting here in Northwest Florida? Well, we do and you’d be wise to learn about them and how to recognize them.

These caterpillars do not sting in the same way that a wasp or bee might sting. They do not have “stingers.” But they do have spines, also called nettling hairs, which are connected to poison glands that can inflict a painful reaction if touched.

The four nettling caterpillars that you are more likely to encounter in Florida are the hag caterpillar, Io moth caterpillar, puss caterpillar and saddleback caterpillar. Those that you are less likely to come in contact with include the buck moth caterpillar, flannel moth caterpillar, spiny oak-slug caterpillar and tussock moth caterpillar.

The “sting” is unintentional, not deliberate. When brushed against or touched, the toxin-bearing spines break off, releasing toxins. In some cases, broken spines pierce the skin. In other cases, toxins leak out onto the surface of the skin.

A University of Florida-IFAS Extension publication about these caterpillars states, “Some people experience severe reactions to the poison released by the spines and require medical attention. Others experience only an itching or burning sensation.”

The kind of reaction can depend on the type of caterpillar, extent of contact and susceptibility of individual. Fortunately, most of these caterpillars spend most of their time high up in trees away from us. But they can blow out of the trees during windy weather or come down still attached to branches and limbs that fall.

The saddleback caterpillar is more likely to be encountered because it feeds on many of our common landscape plants such as hibiscus and palms. But it is also known to feed on azaleas, fruit trees and even canna lilies. The saddleback caterpillar is striking in appearance with what looks like a bright green “blanket” draped over its back and a brown saddle-shaped oval area in the center of the blanket. Its spines are colorful, sharp and protrude from the front, back and sides of the caterpillar. It is stout and 1 to 1.5 inches long.

I’ve received questions about the puss caterpillar recently from people who have encountered it. This caterpillar is stout-bodied, almost 1 inch long and completely covered with gray to brown soft hairs. They seem to prefer leaves of oaks and citrus but they will feed on a variety of broadleaf trees and shrubs,

Because of their bright colors and interesting appearance, children may be tempted to touch or pick up some of these stinging caterpillars.

More information on these caterpillars is available at these websites:

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/IN/IN01400.pdf

http://www.poisoncentertampa.org/poison-topics/venomous-critters/caterpillars