Monthly Archive: March 2014

March is an ideal time to consider wild birds

Spring is a dynamic time for wildlife. If you enjoy watching nature, now is a fantastic time to get outdoors to see some interesting activity. March is also one of the best times of year to do some active management on your property to enhance the habitat you provide for wildlife. Because of its position …

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Aquatic and Natural Areas Pesticide Training and Exams

Pesticide Training and Exams being offered at the University of Florida IFAS Okaloosa County Extension Office. March 31, 2014 8am-11am     Aquatic Pesticide Training 11am             Aquatic Exam 1pm-4pm       Natural Areas Training 4pm               Natural Areas Exam Cost is $10 for Aquatic Training and $10 for Natural Areas Training To receive a new Aquatic or Natural Areas pesticide …

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Deer Nutrition Now Can Pay Off in the Fall

    To the chagrin of hunters across the panhandle deer season has drawn to a close. As the days lengthen and temperatures begin to climb, many of the area’s outdoorsmen (and women) shift their focus to a more aquatic nature. However, those sportsmen, who will place a premium on antler size in the fall, should …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 8th): Tropical Soda Apple & Alligator Weed

            March 8th: Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum) & Alligator Weed (Alternanthera philoxeroide) Tropical Soda Apple: Florida ranchers know Tropical Soda Apple (TSA) as the “Plant from Hell”. The plant is a native of South America. It was first noticed in south Florida, but its seeds survive in the digestive …

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Invasive of the Day (March 7th): Eurasean Milfoil, Tiger Prawn, Cuban Treefrog

March 7th: Eurasian Milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum), Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon), The Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)   Eurasian Water Milfoil: Eurasian water milfoil is a submerged aquatic plant that can be found in northwest Florida in lakes, rivers, and coastal marshes. Water milfoil forms a dense mat of vegetation that can block sunlight and habitat …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 6th): Climbing Ferns & Chinese Privet

March 6th: Climbing Ferns (Lygodium sp.) & Chinese Privet (Ligustrum sinense) Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Old World Climbing Ferns (Lygodium microphyllum): are presently the only non-native invasive ferns in Florida.  Both ferns reproduce and spread readily by wind-blown spores. A single fertile leaflet can produce 28,600 spores.  Animals, equipment, and even people that …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 5th): Torpedo Grass & Hydrilla

March 5th: Torpedo Grass (Panicum repens) & Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) Torpedo Grass: Torpedo grass (Panicum repens) is an invasive weed that invades lawns, flowerbeds, landscapes and wetlands. Even if introduced into a small area, this weed can rapidly spread to become a monoculture and crowd out native vegetation. Its name is derived from the hard, …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 4th): Benghal Dayflower, Chinese Tallow, Water Hyacinth

March 4th: Benghal Dayflower (Commelina benghalensis), Chinese Tallow (Sapium sebiferum), & Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes):   Benghal Dayflower (Commelina benghalensis): Also called Tropical spiderwort, is an invasive weed that creeps into nurseries, lawns, pastures and crop fields.  It was first observed in the early 1990’s in Florida but can now be found throughout the panhandle …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 3rd): Wild Hogs & Lion Fish

March 3rd: Wild Hogs (Sus scrofa) & Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   Wild Hogs: Wild Hogs, also called Feral Hogs, are not native to the U.S.  Domesticated pigs were introduced by early settlers because they could adapt to a wide variety of habitats.  These pigs were kept on open ranges and used as a food source …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 2nd): Cogongrass & Napier Grass

  March 2nd: Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) & Napier Grass (Pennisetum purpureum):   Cogongrass: Cogongrass is one of the 10 worst weeds in the world.  This grass is an aggressive grower and forms colonies causing loss of productive forest areas, severe degradation of habitat, and economic issues.  Since its introduction in the 1900s, Cogongrass has spread …

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