In this Issue:
  • The Beautiful, but Invasive, Mimosa
  • Grass Carp – A Biological Control “Tool” to Manage Invasive Aquatic Plants
  • A Potential Problem, the Cuban Treefrog
  • The Armored Wanderer – the armadillo
  • NISAW 2018: Invasive Bamboo
  • NISAW 2018: It’s Growing So Well It Must Be A Good Plant
  • NISAW 2018: Chemical Control for Invasive Plants
  • NISAW 2018: Well Behaved Cultivars That Help With Invasive Issues
  • NISAW 2018: Where are we on the Management of Lionfish?
  • NISAW 2018: Successful Feral Hog Management
  • Invasive Species

    The Beautiful, but Invasive, Mimosa

    It is easy to notice the display of bright pink puffs erupting on low-growing trees along roadsides. This attractive plant is the Mimosa tree, Albizia julibrissin. These once popular small trees are commonly found in the yards of older homes in Florida where the display of prolific blooms starts up as the weather warms. This …

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    Grass Carp – A Biological Control “Tool” to Manage Invasive Aquatic Plants

    Spring is only days away.  Everywhere you look, plants of all kinds are awakening to recent rains, longer days, and fertile soils; and this includes aquatic plants as well!  Florida has hundreds of aquatic plant species, and they are an often-overlooked feature of Florida’s landscape.  Overlooked that is, until the growth of non-native (or even …

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    A Potential Problem, the Cuban Treefrog

    As we come to the end of National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW), I need to educate everyone on a potential invasive threat, a classic Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) species – the Cuban Treefrog. This treefrog was first introduced into to south Florida in the 1920’s. Like lionfish, it quickly became established and began …

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    The Armored Wanderer – the armadillo

    The first light of morning can reveal random pockmarks in what had been the perfect lawn the previous evening. The culprit is not likely the neighborhood teenager with a reputation for inappropriate practical jokes. The offender usually is the nine-banded armadillo, sometimes referred to as a Florida-speed-bump or Possum-on-the-half-shell. In addition to manicured landscapes, they …

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    NISAW 2018: Invasive Bamboo

    Standing in the midst of a stand of bamboo, it’s easy to feel dwarfed. Smooth and sturdy, the hollow, sectioned woody shoots of this fascinating plant can tower as tall as 70 feet. Unfortunately, bamboo is a real threat to natural ecosystems, moving quickly through wooded areas, wetlands, and neighborhoods, taking out native species as …

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    NISAW 2018: It’s Growing So Well It Must Be A Good Plant

    You know that plant in the corner of the yard that seems to be taking over?  It’s the one that your friend “passed along” because they had plenty of them and wanted to share.  After all, it grows so well.  How can you go wrong? The odds are that vigorous plant is a non-native species.  …

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    NISAW 2018: Chemical Control for Invasive Plants

    Chemical (Herbicide) treatments, while not the only option, are often required for effective control of woody invasive species. When treating woody invasive species there are three common, relatively simple techniques for applying herbicide; Foliar, Basal, and Cut Stump. Foliar Applications – spray solution is applied directly to leaves. For these applications to be effective leaves …

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    NISAW 2018: Well Behaved Cultivars That Help With Invasive Issues

    An invasive plant is defined as a plant that is non-native to the ecosystem under consideration and whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health (National Invasive Species Council, 2001). Research supports the fact that invasive plants damage natural areas, but there is great debate over …

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    NISAW 2018: Where are we on the Management of Lionfish?

    Since the first lionfish was spotted off Pensacola in 2010, panhandle organizations have been busy trying to control the spread of this invasive species. The story is well known to many… the lionfish is a voracious predator, consuming at least 70 different species of small reef fish, including vermillion snapper.  They reproduce frequently, producing an …

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    NISAW 2018: Successful Feral Hog Management

    Despite efforts by public and private land managers, feral hog populations continue to rise in many areas in Florida. Feral hogs damage crop fields, lawns, wetlands, and forests.  They can negatively impact native species of plants and animals.  Their rooting leads to erosion and decreased water quality. There are several options for controlling feral hogs. …

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