In this Issue:
  • DNA Barcoding Our Way into Understanding the Lionfish Problem
  • Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions
  • Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop
  • NISAW 2017: Bamboo
  • NISAW 2017: Cuban Treefrog—Invasive Invader in Florida
  • NISAW 2017: Trying to Stay Ahead of Beach Vitex
  • NISAW 2017: Laurel Wilt
  • NISAW 2017: Fungal Pathogen Invaders
  • NISAW 2017: Cuban Anole
  • NISAW 2017: It is Common and Abundant, but Torpedo Grass is Still a Problem
  • Invasive Species

    DNA Barcoding Our Way into Understanding the Lionfish Problem

    In the late 1980’s a few exotic lionfish were found off the coast of Dania Florida. I do not think anyone foresaw the impact this was going to have.  Producing tens of thousands of drifting eggs per female each week, they began to disperse following the Gulf Stream.  First in northeast Florida, then the Carolina’s, …

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    Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions

    Life on the coast has tremendous benefits; steady sea breezes, gorgeous beaches, plentiful fishing and paddling opportunities. Nevertheless, there are definite downsides to living along it, too. Besides storms like Hurricane Harvey making semi-regular appearances, our proximity to the water can make us more vulnerable to flooding and waterborne hazards ranging from bacteria to jellyfish. …

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    Invasive Exotic Species and Control Workshop

    Join us to learn about identifying and controlling some of the most troublesome invasive exotic plants like cogongrass, Japanese climbing fern, privet, and others.  We will also address exotic insects that are causing, or will cause, big headaches for forestry and natural resource professionals.  Earn pesticide applicator CEU’s, forestry CEU’s and connect with partnership and …

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    NISAW 2017: Bamboo

    Standing in the midst of a stand of bamboo, it’s easy to feel dwarfed. Smooth and sturdy, the hollow, sectioned woody shoots of this fascinating plant can tower as tall as 70 feet. Unfortunately, bamboo is a real threat to natural ecosystems, moving quickly through wooded areas, wetlands, and neighborhoods, taking out native species as …

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    NISAW 2017: Cuban Treefrog—Invasive Invader in Florida

    Guest Blogger – Dr. Steve A. Johnson, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida The National Invasive Species Council defines an invasive species as one that is introduced outside its native range where it causes harm (or is likely to) to the environment, economy, or human quality of …

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    NISAW 2017: Trying to Stay Ahead of Beach Vitex

    Research shows that the most effective time to deal with an invasive species, both in terms of controlling or eradicating the species and money spent to do so, is early on…. What we call Early Detection Rapid Response. Beach vitex is a good candidate for this. The first record for vitex in the Florida panhandle …

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    NISAW 2017: Laurel Wilt

    Many invasive plants and insects are introduced in packing materials, including 12 species of ambrosia beetles, which embed themselves in wood used as crates and pallets. While these tiny beetles don’t actually feed on wood, the adults and larvae feed on fungi that is inoculated into galleries within the sapwood by the females when they …

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    NISAW 2017: Fungal Pathogen Invaders

    Special Guest Blogger – Lorraine Ketzler, Biological Science Technician with US Fish and Wildlife Service There have been several fungal invaders entering and spreading within the US in recent years and I’d like to draw attention to four of them: White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) Chytridiomycosis (Chytrids) in frogs (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) Chytridiomycosis (B-sal) …

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    NISAW 2017: Cuban Anole

    The brown anole, a lizard native to Cuba and the Bahamas, first appeared in the Florida Keys in 1887. Since then it has moved northward becoming established in nearly every county in Florida. By hitching a ride on boats and cars, as well as, hanging out in landscape plants being shipped throughout the state, the …

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    NISAW 2017: It is Common and Abundant, but Torpedo Grass is Still a Problem

    They say the best time to attack an invasive species is early in its arrival. In the early stages is your best chance, using the most cost effective methods, of eradicating an invasive species from a region.  Hence our focus on Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) list.  That is not the case with Torpedo Grass.  …

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