In this Issue:
  • Now is the Time to Start Preparing for Cool-Season Food Plots
  • Researchers Test Traps for Controlling Deepwater Invasive Lionfish
  • An Unwanted Invasive Plant; Beach Vitex
  • Invasive Species Awareness Day a Success
  • The Air Potato Challenge
  • The Beautiful, but Invasive, Mimosa
  • Grass Carp – A Biological Control “Tool” to Manage Invasive Aquatic Plants
  • A Potential Problem, the Cuban Treefrog
  • The Armored Wanderer – the armadillo
  • NISAW 2018: Invasive Bamboo
  • Invasive Species

    Now is the Time to Start Preparing for Cool-Season Food Plots

    I know it feels too hot outside to talk about hunting season or cool-season food plots, but planting time will be here before you know it and now’s the time to start preparing. The recommended planting date for practically all cool-season forage crops in Northwest Florida is October 1 – November 15. Assuming adequate soil …

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    Researchers Test Traps for Controlling Deepwater Invasive Lionfish

    Written By: Laura Tiu, Holden Harris, and Alexander Fogg It’s early morning as Dreadknot Charters speeds out of Destin Harbor towards the offshore reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers Holden Harris (Graduate Research Fellow, University of Florida), Alex Fogg, (Marine Resource Coordinator, Okaloosa County), and the Dreadknot crew, Josh and Joe Livingston, ready their …

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    An Unwanted Invasive Plant; Beach Vitex

    This week’s article is a bit different… it is about nature we hope you DO NOT see – but hope you let us know if you do. Most of you know that Florida, along with many other states, continually battle invasive species.  From Burmese pythons, to lionfish, to monitor lizards, we have problems with them …

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    Invasive Species Awareness Day a Success

    Steve Johnson UF/IFAS Extension shares Exotic Invaders: Reptiles and Amphibians of Concern in Northwest Florida. (Updated June 7 2018 – 10AM CDT) http://www.eddmaps.org and http://ufwildlife.ifas.ufl.edu/steve_johnson.shtml   Rick tells us about the ball python, a potential invasive species. Rick also provides an overview of keeping pythons and other snakes as pets. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/UW/UW34100.pdf Holli tells us about …

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    The Air Potato Challenge

    By L. Scott Jackson and Julie B. McConnell, UF/IFAS Extension Bay County Northwest Florida’s pristine natural world is being threaten by a group of non-native plants and animals known collectively as invasive species. Exotic invasive species originate from other continents and have adverse impacts on our native habitats and species. Many of these problem non-natives …

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    The Beautiful, but Invasive, Mimosa

    It is easy to notice the display of bright pink puffs erupting on low-growing trees along roadsides. This attractive plant is the Mimosa tree, Albizia julibrissin. These once popular small trees are commonly found in the yards of older homes in Florida where the display of prolific blooms starts up as the weather warms. This …

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    Grass Carp – A Biological Control “Tool” to Manage Invasive Aquatic Plants

    Spring is only days away.  Everywhere you look, plants of all kinds are awakening to recent rains, longer days, and fertile soils; and this includes aquatic plants as well!  Florida has hundreds of aquatic plant species, and they are an often-overlooked feature of Florida’s landscape.  Overlooked that is, until the growth of non-native (or even …

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    A Potential Problem, the Cuban Treefrog

    As we come to the end of National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW), I need to educate everyone on a potential invasive threat, a classic Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) species – the Cuban Treefrog. This treefrog was first introduced into to south Florida in the 1920’s. Like lionfish, it quickly became established and began …

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    The Armored Wanderer – the armadillo

    The first light of morning can reveal random pockmarks in what had been the perfect lawn the previous evening. The culprit is not likely the neighborhood teenager with a reputation for inappropriate practical jokes. The offender usually is the nine-banded armadillo, sometimes referred to as a Florida-speed-bump or Possum-on-the-half-shell. In addition to manicured landscapes, they …

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    NISAW 2018: Invasive Bamboo

    Standing in the midst of a stand of bamboo, it’s easy to feel dwarfed. Smooth and sturdy, the hollow, sectioned woody shoots of this fascinating plant can tower as tall as 70 feet. Unfortunately, bamboo is a real threat to natural ecosystems, moving quickly through wooded areas, wetlands, and neighborhoods, taking out native species as …

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