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Grass Carp – A Biological Control to Manage Pond Weeds

Adult grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella Val. Credit: Jeffrey E. Hill, University of Florida

Florida has hundreds of aquatic plant species, and they are an often-overlooked feature of Florida’s landscape.  Overlooked that is, until the growth of non-native (even some native) species interferes with use of our waters.  Some aquatic plant species can become problematic in Florida waters when their growth interferes with fishing, flood control, navigation, recreation, livestock watering, or irrigation.  For these reasons, being knowledgeable about properly managing aquatic plants is important to the many uses of Florida’s waters, whether it be a state managed public waterbody, or your own backyard farm pond.

Any pest, whether plant, animal, or insect, is best managed using “IPM” or Integrated Pest Management.  IPM involves using a variety of available “management tools” to control pests in an economically and environmentally sound manner.  As in any IPM effort, the first thing to do is identify what is causing the problem.  Next, define what your management goals are.  Then, research what tools are available for you to manage the problem.  And finally, devise and implement your management plan.

In this article, we will look at one of the “IPM tools” used to manage aquatic plants – the grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella Val.).  The use of grass carp to manage problematic levels of aquatic plants falls under the general management term of “biological control.”  Biological control essentially uses one living organism to control another living organism.  Grass carp have become one of the most widely recognized examples of biological control.

The Grass Carp

As the name implies, the grass carp is an herbivorous fish that eats plants.  It is native to eastern Russia and China, living in large muddy rivers and associated lakes, and is actually one of the largest members of the minnow family.  According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the largest triploid grass carp taken in Florida was 15 years old, 56″ long and weighed 75 pounds!  The grass carp has been introduced into more than 50 countries and is used as a food item in many places around the world.  They are used in nearly all states of the USA to manage aquatic plants.

Introduction into the United States

The grass carp was considered for introduction into the U.S. primarily because of its plant-eating diet, which was thought to have great potential for the control of aquatic weeds. In 1963 the U.S. Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife Fish Farming Experiment Station, Stuttgart, Arkansas, in cooperation with Auburn University, imported grass carp for experimental purposes; in 1970, this fish was introduced into Florida primarily for researchers to study its ability to control hydrilla.” (Grass Carp: A Fish for Biological Management of Hydrilla and Other Aquatic Weeds in Florida).   “Early release of diploid fish led to reproductive populations in several US drainage systems, including the Mississippi River and major tributaries” (Grass Carp, the White Amur: Ctenopharyngodon idella Cuvier and Valenciennes (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae: Squaliobarbinae))

Development of the Sterile Triploid

According to the UF/IFAS publication, Grass Carp, the White Amur: Ctenopharyngodon idella Cuvier and Valenciennes (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae: Squaliobarbinae), “Use of the fish was limited from 1970 until 1984 due to tight regulations surrounding concerns of escape and reproduction, and the potential impacts that colonization of the fish could have on native flora and fauna. These concerns led to research that developed a non-reproductive fish, which was equally effective in controlling hydrilla.”  This non-reproductive fish is known as the triploid grass carp.  Through a process of subjecting fertilized grass carp eggs to heat, cold, or pressure, the resulting fish have an extra set of chromosomes rendering the fish sterile.  Triploid carp have the same herbivorous characteristics as the normal diploid carp, but they are unable to spawn and reproduce. Their inability to reproduce is what makes them a viable tool to manage aquatic plants, and that is because their numbers and feeding pressure can be controlled, they cannot overpopulate a waterbody, nor if they escape, will they overpopulate un-managed areas.

The growth of invasive aquatic plant species can interfere with the many uses of Florida’s waters. This is invasive hydrilla mixed with water lilies in a Florida lake. Photo by Judy Biss

What kinds of aquatic plants do they eat?

The grass carp grazes on many types of aquatic plants, but it does have its preferences.  Its most preferred aquatics plants are hydrilla, chara (musk grass), pondweed, southern naiad, and Brazilian elodea.  Its least favorite aquatic plants are species such as water lily, sedges, cattails, and filamentous algae.  It will, however, graze on many types of plants, even shoreline or overhanging vegetation in the absence of its preferred foods.  Another reason the grass carp is an effective plant management tool is because it eats many times its body weight in plant material.  As stated in Grass Carp, the White Amur: Ctenopharyngodon idella Cuvier and Valenciennes (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae: Squaliobarbinae), “every 1 lb. increase in fish weight requires 5–6 lbs. of dry hydrilla (Sutton et al. 2012), which—considering hydrilla is 95% water—is a great deal of live plant material.”

Use of Grass Carp as a Biological Control

Integrating the use of grass carp in aquatic plant management plans is usually cost effective.  In many cases involving the use of grass carp, overabundant aquatic weed infestations are first treated with an aquatic herbicide to reduce biomass.  The carp are then stocked to control regrowth and to extend the time between herbicide treatments.  This can be up to 5 or more years, depending on the situation.  One factor in long term control is the survival of the stocked grass carp.  They are not without predators as largemouth bass, otters, birds, etc. readily prey on small grass carp.  Stocked fish should be at least 12 inches long to help avoid predation and provide plant control.  Other considerations to factor into your management plans are the long term, yet non-specific, control that grass carp can provide.  If not stocked in the correct manner, they may end up eating aquatic plants that you wish to maintain.  Also, if they eat all the aquatic plants, your once clear water may become dominated by algae instead.

How can I get grass carp for my lake or pond?

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) administers the Grass Carp program for Florida.  A permit is required before you can purchase carp, and only the sterile triploid carp are permitted for use in Florida.  The FWC can answer many questions about the use of grass carp and if this aquatic plant management “tool” is the right one for you to use in your particular situation.  In north Florida, the regional FWC office is located at 3911 Highway 2321 Panama City, FL 32409, Phone: 850-767-3638.

Additional information taken from the FWC Triploid Grass Carp Permit Website:

What do I need to know about triploid grass carp?

Cost: Triploid grass carp cost between $5 and $15 each and are usually stocked at three to ten fish per acre, resulting in costs as low as $15 per acre. In comparison, herbicides cost between $100 and $500 per acre and mechanical control may cost more than twice that.

Time: Grass carp usually take six months to a year to be effective in reducing problem vegetation, although they provide much longer term control than other methods, often up to five years before restocking is necessary. When used in conjunction with an initial herbicide treatment, control of problem vegetation can be achieved quickly, and fewer carp are required to maintain the desired level of vegetation.

Overstocking: Once stocked in a lake or pond, carp are very difficult to remove. If overstocking occurs, it may be ten years or more before the vegetation community recovers. Even after carp are removed, other herbivores such as turtles may prevent the regrowth of vegetation.

Water Clarity: Aquatic plants remove nutrients in the water. When plants are removed, nutrients may then be utilized by phytoplankton, turning the water green. Clarity may be improved by reducing or eliminating sources of nutrients into the lake such as road runoff and lawn fertilizer.

Inflows/Outflows: It is in the best interest of people stocking carp to keep them in the desired lake or pond. It is also a required condition of the permit. Any inflows or outflows through which carp could escape into other waters require barriers to prevent fish from escaping into waters not permitted.

For more information on this topic, please see the following resources used for this article:
Aquatic and Wetland Plants in Florida
Plant Management in Florida Waters
Grass Carp, the White Amur: Ctenopharyngodon idella Cuvier and Valenciennes (Actinopterygii: Cyprinidae: Squaliobarbinae),
Grass Carp: A Fish for Biological Management of Hydrilla and Other Aquatic Weeds in Florida).
Chinese Grass Carp
FWC Triploid Grass Carp Permit
UF/IFAS Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants – Aquatic Plant Control Methods
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Author: Judy Biss - judy.biss@ufl.edu

Judy Biss is the Agriculture and Natural Resource Agent in Calhoun County, Florida

Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/05/18/grass-carp-a-biological-control-to-manage-invasive-pond-weeds/