Davidson Washington County Agricultural Innovator

Davidson Washington County Agricultural Innovator

Picture1On Friday August 9, 2013, 13 Innovative Farmers and Ranchers were recognized by University of Florida IFAS Extension and Farm Credit of Northwest Florida at the Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center in Marianna.  This is the third year these two organizations have teamed up to honor a selection of the most innovative farmers from the Florida Panhandle.

The purpose of the Agriculture Innovator Recognition Program is to annually recognize innovative farmers and ranchers from 16 Florida Panhandle counties, from Jefferson west to Escambia County.  In 2013, County Agriculture Extension Agents from 13 counties selected an Agricultural Innovator to recognize from each of the counties where they serve.

Davidson 13 Washington Ag Innov

(From left to right) Washington Co. Horticulture Agent Matthew Orwat, Paul Davidson, LeeAnn Davidson, and Washington Co. Agriculture Agent Mark Mauldin.

The 2013 Washington County Agricultural Innovator is Paul Davidson. Paul owns and operates Davidson Farms. Paul Davidson was nominated by Matthew Orwat, the Washington County Horticulture Agent.  Read Paul’s’ story below.  Links are provided at the end of the article for other Ag Innovators previously highlighted. Additional award winners will be featured in Panhandle Ag e-News in the coming weeks.

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Printer friendly PDF version: Paul Davidson (Davidson Farms), Washington County

Agricultural Innovators highlighted in previous weeks:

Ken Barton (Barton Family Farm), Holmes County

Oglesby Plants International, Calhoun County

Ron and Rosemary Prokop (R&R Ranch), Walton County

Herman Laramore (Bar L Ranch), Jackson County

Nixon Farms (Shannon Nixon), Okaloosa County

JMAK Farms (Gerald Hubbell), Gadsden County

Stephen and Tracie Fulford, Jefferson County

Wakulla Berries (Rachel McClure), Wakulla County

Miller Family Aquaponics, Escambia County

Turkey Hill Farm  (Herman Holley & Louise Divine), Leon County

Killam Farm, Inc. (Lucas Killam), Santa Rosa County

 

NW Florida Agricultural Innovators – Holmes and Washington Counties

On Friday August 17th, 13 Innovative Farmers and Ranchers were recognized by University of Florida IFAS Extension and Farm Credit of Northwest Florida at the Jay Community Center in Santa Rosa County.  This is the second year these two organizations have teamed up to honor a selection of the most innovative farmers in the Florida Panhandle.

The purpose of the Agriculture Innovator Recognition Program is to annually recognize innovative farmers and ranchers from 16 Florida Panhandle counties, from Jefferson west to Escambia County.  In 2012, County Agriculture Extension Agents from 13 counties selected an Agricultural Innovator to recognize from each of the counties where they serve.  Doug Mayo, Jackson County Extension Director who chaired this year’s event, said “County Agents in the Panhandle honored their brightest farmers at the awards luncheon.   We hope that bringing these top-notch farmers all together in one place will help stimulate future innovation.  Highlighting these creative and successful farmers will also help increase awareness of the diversity and innovation of today’s modern agriculture located right here in our area.”

Holmes County Extention Director, Shep Eubanks, presenting the award to Renee Savary

Renee Savary, of Bonifay, FL, was recognized as Holmes County’s Agricultural Innovator for 2012.  To read more about Renee and Twin Oaks Farm click here.

Washington County Extension Dirtector, Andy Andreason, presenting the award to Byron Biddle of Three Oaks Winery

Byron Biddle, of Vernon, FL, was recognized as Washington County’s Agricultural Innovator for 2012.  To read more about Byron and Three Oaks Winery click here.

Over the next several weeks Panhandle Ag e-News will feature each of the NW Florida Innovators from Escambia county to Jefferson County.

Agricultural Innovators highlighted in previous issues:

Larry Ford, Jackson County

Mark Casson, Escambia County

Bruce Holland, Santa Rosa County

James and Nick Marshall, Okaloosa County

Donnie Richardson, Walton County

 

 

Washington County: Crop Conditions Good

Temperatures in the 90’s and high humidity may open-the-door to white mold in peanuts

Summer rains are coming on a regular basis and with sufficient quantity. Corn, cotton, soybeans and peanuts are all looking very good, better than they have in the past three years.

Pressure from Army Worms is still a problem in fertilized hay fields. Scouting is ongoing, and flocks of Cattle Egrets in a pasture or hayfield are not a welcome sight. Also, Chinch Bugs are a serious pest now in millet and have killed some fields in  northern Washington County.

Pastures are also responding to the rain showers, and cattle are doing well with ample forage.

Leafspot control on peanuts is more of a challenge this year because of the frequent showers. White mold could become an issue with temperatures well into the 90’s for several days.

Submitted by Andy Andreasen, (amarj@ufl.edu) Washington County Extension Director

Washington County Farmers Taking Advantage of Hit-or-Miss Rain

Washington County grazing has improved in places with the recent rains

Recent rains have been spotty, hitting some farms and missing others. However peanut and cotton growers are quickly taking advantage of available moisture for soil preparation and planting those areas of the county with adequate moisture.

Improving pasture quality and quantity is reducing the amount of hay being fed. Some Bermuda hay fields in the eastern Washington County are experiencing significant pressure from army worms and leaf hoppers.

Cattle conditions are improving with improved pasture conditions.  Rain prospects for the coming week are continuing the hit-or-miss pattern.

Squash harvest and other local vegetables are underway. Submitted by Andy Andreasen, Washington County Extension Director

Washington County Update

Much needed rain on Wednesday, April 18, help pastures make a rapid recovery from drought-stress.

The rain has not slowed land preparation for cotton and peanuts.  Growers are proceeding at a rapid pace.

Watermelons are ahead or on schedule for an early harvest, and hopefully higher prices. Submitted by Andy Andreason, Washington County Extension Director