Healthy Holiday Newsletter

Healthy Holiday Newsletter

The holiday season is finally upon us. It’s a time for enjoying family, friends, and food!  

You can make healthy habits this holiday season. It’s not only a single meal but rather an entire season of parties, events, gatherings festivities, and unhealthy choices that add up to that holiday weight gain we resolve to lose when January rolls around. As the holiday season begins its rapid approach, take time and consider those eating habits that set your new year off on the wrong foot.  Why not make a resolution now to eat healthier this holiday season?

Just a few simple strategies can help make the difference and keep those unwanted pounds away.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Don’t skip meals. Eating healthy on a regular basis will keep you from overindulging at holiday gatherings.
  • Use smaller plates for meals and gatherings and be mindful of portions
  • Choose more vegetables and smaller helpings of entrees and desserts
  • Drink more water and minimize alcoholic drinks and eggnog
  • Make healthier recipe ingredient substitutions when cooking and baking

Take a mindful approach to keeping your personal health goals in-check. We can all still experience the joy of the holiday season, without making food the focus. Make a resolution to be mindful and eat healthier this holiday season, and your waistline will thank you!

Learn more about making healthy habits this holiday season!

— Tips for Making Healthy Choices

— Simple Substitutions

— Diabetes During the Holidays

— How to Add Fruits and Veggies

— Cranberry Nutrition

— Cranberry Sauce Recipe

— Holiday Food Safety Tips

Click here to read the newsletter.

Meet Your FCS Agent- Claire Reach

Meet Your FCS Agent- Claire Reach

Photo Source: Auburn University IHSA Equestrian Team

Claire Reach is the UF/IFAS 4-H & Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agent in Calhoun County, Florida. For 4-H, she specializes in animal handling, animal safety, and animal sciences. For FCS, she mainly specializes in food safety and healthy living, but has found a new opportunity to work with First Time Homebuyers and the State Housing Initiative Partnership Program (SHIP) in the county.

Claire grew up in Alabama, splitting her time between Birmingham and her family’s farm, L & L Angus Farm, in Auburn. The family farm is Claire’s driving force behind the passion that she has for agriculture, which is a large part of the work she is doing in Extension.

 

These pictures are of my family on the farm in Auburn, AL. Photo Source: Dave Davis.

Peep some of the cows in the background. Photo Source: Elise Reach.

With a family background in Ag, she decided to study Animal Science-Production Management at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama. While completing her undergraduate degree, Claire competed for Auburn University’s Intercollegiate Horse Show Association, worked at Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in a research barn, and continued to work on the family farm. She graduated in May of 2019 with her Bachelor of Science and a minor in Agricultural Business.

 

Several home cooking/canning classes offered in 2021. Strawberry jam, chicken, pepper jelly, salsa, and mozzarella cheese have been made! Photo Source: Claire Reach UF/IFAS.

 

The Calhoun County 4-H Horse Club recently started up! (The 2 horses on the right side of the image also belong to me.) Photo Source: Dave Davis.

Shortly after graduation, she moved to Florida to work for Deseret Cattle and Timber as a Heavy Machinery Operator, but soon realized that her passion was Extension. The position in Calhoun County became available and she jumped at the opportunity to apply for it. Having just started in May 2021, Claire has not been with UF/IFAS Extension long, but she cannot wait to see what the future holds for her county. Claire says that she aspires for the Calhoun County FCS Program to be the area’s leading program for adults in practical home practices, whether that be home canning or healthy eating, and healthy living. All the programs that she offers, whether it be 4-H or FCS, follow the same motto: ‘learn by doing’. This drives the experience of each program, allowing participants to fully understand a concept or ask questions when they do not.

 

These are the “goodest” dogs of all time! Evie (Chocolate Lab), Diesel (Black and White Mutt), and Hank (Bassett Hound-laying down) Peep the chickens, turkeys, cat, and horses in the back ground! Photo Source: Claire Reach UF/IFAS.

This is Chick! For a mare, she’s pretty special. We have a great bond and she trusts me to do just about anything with her (i.e. shoot a gun off of, rope cattle, stand on, lay on, or let little kids ride) Photo Source: Tanner Mayo.

When Claire is not at work, she says there is always more work to be done at home. Living on a functioning livestock operation, she has several animals, including: chickens (about 50 at the moment), 5 guineas, 4 turkeys, 2 cats, 4 dogs, and 3 horses. She hopes to be able to add cattle to the ever-growing “funny farm” soon! It isn’t always about work, though. In her spare time, Claire enjoys spending time with family, riding her horses, long walks with the dogs, dirt road riding, and paddle boarding at the beach!

Preparing for the Storm – What’s for Dinner?

Preparing for the Storm – What’s for Dinner?

Stock up on canned fruits, vegetables, meats, and heat-and-eat soups for your hurricane food supply kit. Photo source: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

Now that we are officially in Hurricane Season (June1-November 30) and named storms are paying a call to the Sunshine State, it’s time to make sure we are prepared.

At the top of the list is planning meals for you and your family. Many people grab snack-type foods, such as crackers, cookies, and chips, or whatever is available on store shelves when the storm is approaching without having a meal plan in mind. Use MyPlate as a guide to plan meals to include fruits, vegetables, whole grains, protein, and dairy products. Foods from each food group provide important vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients to properly fuel your body so you are better equipped to deal with the challenges and stresses that accompany hurricanes and other disasters.

Plan a two-week supply of nonperishable or canned food and juices that require little or no cooking and no refrigeration. Include healthy snacks and any special foods for infants, senior adults, or persons with specific dietary needs. Select foods your family likes and will eat. Plan meals and shop early before a storm is on the horizon so you have a greater food selection and can take advantage of sales to stock up at a reduced cost. Keep planned written menus that have worked well for you and your family inside your hurricane food supply kit in a re-sealable plastic bag.

Brenda Marty-Jimenez, Family and Consumer Sciences Agent with UF/IFAS Extension Broward County, offers the following menu suggestions:

Breakfast Ideas

Apple juice • ready-to-eat cereal • small boxes of raisins • breakfast bars with fruit • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Orange juice • hot cereal/instant oatmeal • banana • muffin • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Grape juice •ready-to-eat cereal • canned peaches • yogurt • bread with jam or jelly • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Lunch Options

Chunky beef soup (ready-to-eat style that only needs heating) • crackers • carrot and celery sticks • nuts • fruit cups packed in water • vanilla wafers • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Canned cream soup (ready-to-eat style that only needs heating) • tuna sandwich on whole-wheat bread • tomato slices • unsweetened applesauce • cookies • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Canned chili with beans (ready-to-eat style that only needs heating) • dinner rolls with margarine or butter • broccoli florets • canned fruit • animal crackers • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Dinner Suggestions

Canned meat or cheese ravioli • three-bean salad (canned) • fresh yellow apples • bread with margarine or butter • fat-free pudding cup • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Egg-salad sandwich on whole-wheat bread • canned green beans • canned fruit • fat-free pudding cup • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

Mac and cheese • canned vegetable • fresh pears • dinner rolls with margarine or butter • cookies • shelf-stable skim milk • tea or instant coffee • water

 

Remember the four key food safety principles: Cook, Clean, Chill, and Separate.

  • Use a food thermometer to check the internal temperature of cooked foods.
  • Wash hands for 20 seconds with soap and water. Sanitize food preparation and cooking surfaces regularly.
  • Put leftovers in sealed bags or shallow containers and pack on ice or store in the refrigerator if it is running on a generator. Dispose of food that has been at room temperature for more than two hours (one hour if the temperature is 90oF or above) or has an off-odor, color, or texture.
  • Toss out food that has come in contact with contaminated flood water. Do not eat foods from dented, swollen, or corroded cans, even though the food may appear safe to eat.

For more hurricane meal planning ideas and tips, visit: http://blogs.ifas.ufl.edu/browardco/2020/06/01/hurricane-preparedness-meal-and-menu-planning/

 

Canned Food Gone Bad…

Canned Food Gone Bad…

A dent can lead to food spoilage in canned products.
Photo source: Heidi Copeland

It started with a visible dark line running down the pantry wall. My eye traced the dark line up to an upper shelf, only to realize a can of food was leaking. My first reaction was, “Oh, no! Botulism!” then I quickly recognized that the guilty can contained a highly acidic food, which hinders the growth of Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium that causes botulism.

A yeast more likely caused the line creeping along the wall. However, it still made for a fun afternoon of cleaning and inspecting every remaining can in the pantry.

As the photo illustrates, the can was leaking from a tiny, indecipherable breach. Perhaps there was a small dent in the can when it was purchased. Maybe it was dropped and the damage went unnoticed. However, one thing that is certain is that purchasing and storing a damaged can is cause for concern. Dents, punctures, or even rough handling can compromise the integrity of a can, which can lead to leaks and contamination.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) monitors the safety and integrity of canned foods. The incidence of spoilage in canned foods is low, but when it occurs, it is important to know what to do. In most cases, the best actions to take are to discard the food immediately and thoroughly clean any contaminated areas. NEVER open a bulging or leaking can. Wear protective equipment, especially gloves, when handling damaged and leaking cans.

The table below includes useful descriptive terms used in the canned food industry – it is a helpful tool for the consumer, too.

Photo source: www.fda.gov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From a cursory glance, I learned externally, my can was a leaker. The can was ever so slightly dented; perhaps the dent caused a weakness, the can rusted, and the liquid started to drain out.

Because of this canned food misadventure, my pantry got an early spring-cleaning. All the items around the offending can were removed, inspected, and thoroughly cleaned. The shelves and walls were also cleaned to remove any residue.

Cleaning the pantry should not just be done when something leaks, however. The cans and boxes in the pantry should be regularly rotated (first in, first out: FIFO) as well as inspected for pests and/or damage, and the shelves and walls should be periodically cleaned to help prevent any cross-contamination.

Other than leakage, mold, or other obvious clues that canned food is spoiled, there are other signs as well, some of which may not be noticeable until after the can is opened. Some of these include:

  1. The can lid does not seem attached correctly: it moves when touched or is bulging.
  2. The food spurts out when the can is opened.
  3. The can is rusting or corroded. Both rust and corrosion will eventually create tiny holes that let both air and bacteria into the food can.
  4. Dents: dents compromise the integrity of metal, causing a breach. Even the smallest breach in the can may lead to contamination and spoilage.
  5. Sound: an unnatural, loud hiss when the can is opened can be a sign of unwanted fermentation or other biological processes.
  6. Unpleasant smells are a good way to detect possible spoilage, even if the food still looks good.

Visual inspections are important in the food world. Do not wait until there is a mess in the pantry before taking an inventory and weeding out the old and damaged products. It is important to rotate even canned food to keep it from sitting too long. Store newer items behind older ones to ensure items are used before their expiration dates.

Resource: https://www.fda.gov/food/laboratory-methods-food/bam-chapter-21a-examination-canned-foods

For more information about food safety and proper food storage, please contact:

Heidi Copeland, Leon County Extension Office, 850.606.5229.

Samantha Kennedy, Wakulla County Extension Office, 850.926.3931

 

Keep It Fresh, Keep It Safe

Keep It Fresh, Keep It Safe

Spring has arrived.  It is fresh produce season.  The USDA Dietary Guidelines recommend that half your plate should be filled with fruits and vegetables. Select a rainbow of colorful fresh fruits and vegetables to enhance your diet.

farmers market with produce

Keep It Fresh
Photo Source: UF/IFAS

There is a bountiful supply of fruits and vegetables during the Spring and Summer months.  Grocery stores, famers markets, and backyard gardens abound with abundant supply of fresh produce.

Recently fresh produce has been linked to various outbreaks of foodborne illness.  These problems are becoming more common and it is important as a consumer to know how to handle fresh produce safely.

Safe Produce Handling Tips

 Purchasing

Purchase vegetables and fruits that look and smell fresh.  Purchase only the amount you will use in a few days.  Most vegetables and fruits with the exception of apples, potatoes, and citrus don’t store well for long periods of time.

Storing

Put produce away promptly.  Most whole produce will keep best stored in perforated plastic bags in the refrigerator crisper drawer where the humidity is highest.  Tomatoes and potatoes are two exceptions.  Tomatoes taste better if stored at room temperature.  Potatoes stay fresh longer if stored in a cool, dry, dark place.  Cut produce should be stored in the refrigerator in covered containers.  Bacteria can grow on cut surfaces of produce.

Washing

Rinse whole produce thoroughly under clean running tap water, just before you are ready to use.  Do not wash fruits and vegetables with detergent.  Scrub or rub as needed to remove surface contamination.  Wash produce such as oranges and melons even if you don’t eat the rind or skin.  When you cut into a fruit or vegetable, any bacteria that is on the surface can be transferred to the inner flesh.  Check the label instructions on fresh bagged produce.  For example; use by date, pre-washed, and ready to eat.  Discard stored fruits and vegetables that appear moldy or smell musty.

It is essential to our health to preserve the nutrition that is found in fruits and vegetables.  Fruits and vegetables contain an abundance of vitamins and minerals that the body needs to maintain optimal health.  Following those easy safe produce tips can help preserve freshness and assure safe produce handling.