Farm Bill Seed Cotton and Hurricane Program Updates

Farm Bill Seed Cotton and Hurricane Program Updates

Cotton field with open white bolls

On September 7, 2018, courtesy of Clover Leaf and Sowega Cotton Gins, the Jackson County Extension Office hosted a two-hour meeting for cotton growers. Don Shurley Professor Emeritus of the University of Georgia and John VanSickle with the University of Florida shared pertinent information regarding risk management program decisions, and the upcoming deadlines for cotton growers. This meeting was also web broadcast via Zoom to participating Extension Offices across Florida’s Panhandle in order to increase the number of producers reached. The meeting was recorded live and the labelled presentations are available below for viewing along with their PDF versions.

The first hour consisted of Don Shurley giving an overview of the seed cotton program (specifically in terms of how it works and how prices and payments will be calculated) and then discussing the generic base conversion options.  The following was the recorded presentation explaining the Seed Cotton Program provided at this training.

Important date regarding the seed cotton program:
1. December 7, 2018 -enrollment deadline for seed cotton program and make base elections.

Seed Cotton Program Overview Handout used at the meeting
Printer friendly Seed Cotton Presentation
Seed Cotton Program Decision Aid spreadsheet mentioned in the presentation

Dr. Shurely also wrote an article on the Seed Cotton Program: Understanding Your Generic Base Conversion Options with the New Seed Cotton Program

After the farm bill update, Dr. Shurely also briefly covered the Market Facilitation Program (MFP) and what it entails.

Market Facilitation Program (MFP) Handout

During the second hour, John VanSickle discussed the Wildfires and Hurricanes Indemnity Program (WHIP). This program enables the USDA’s Farm Service Agency to make disaster payments to offset losses from hurricanes and wildfires during 2017. WHIP covers both the loss of the crop, tree, bush or vine as well as the loss in production.

Important dates regarding the WHIP program:
1. November 16, 2018- enrollment deadline.

WHIP Program Factsheet
Printer friendly WHIP Presentation

Boron Deficiency:  A Rare but Serious Issue in Peanut

Boron Deficiency: A Rare but Serious Issue in Peanut

Figure 1. Boron deficient Tifguard, more than 100 days after planting. Field composed of well drained sand in Jackson County. Confirmed by soil and tissue tests.

Authors: Ethan Carter, UF/IFAS Regional Crop IPM Agent, and Michael Mulvaney, UF/IFAS Cropping Systems Specialist (WFREC)

Now that it’s early June, peanut fields across the Panhandle range in age from freshly planted to nearly 40 days after planting. Within the past two weeks, many areas have had consistent rainfall and overcast days. The recent weather has left fields saturated, complicating late plantings and spray applications. It also presents the opportunity to discuss potential issues associated with a nutrient that leaches like boron.

Boron is highly mobile and can rapidly leach from the root zone. Along with manganese, it is one of the most commonly deficient micronutrients on sandy soils. When tissue testing is done to evaluate boron levels, the entire above-ground portion of plants are collected. The desired range is 20-60 ppm, with less than 20 ppm being a critical level for deficiency and 100 ppm or more being a critical level for toxicity. Deficiency can occur when little or no boron is applied with the crop fertilizer. In our region, typically well to excessively-drained sands are most susceptible to boron deficiency. In peanut, boron deficiency is associated with hollow-heart, which lowers grade. This condition presents itself as discoloration within the kernel. However, severe boron deficiency can present itself in a manner similar to zinc toxicity- with split stems and roots, compacted branch terminals, and few developing pods (Figures 1, 2, and 3).

Figure 2. Split stems and roots on Tifguard plants suffering from boron deficiency in Jackson County. Confirmed by soil and tissue tests.

Figure 3. Split branches in Tifguard suffering from boron deficiency in Jackson County. Confirmed by soil and tissue tests.

When these types of  symptoms are found, a tissue and soil test are important to determine if the field has issues with either boron or zinc.  Boron can be added in with the initial crop fertilizer, or applied with early herbicide and fungicide applications. Foliar applications of 0.5 lb/ac elemental boron can be made during mid-bloom to correct boron deficiency.

Fertility should always be monitored after prolonged rain events or heavy irrigation. Nutrient leaching can result in unexpected field problems. More information regarding boron in peanut can be found in the following articles:

  1. Field Symptoms of Boron Toxicity and Deficiency in Florida Peanuts

  2. Management and Cultural Practices for Peanuts

  3. Boron and Other Minor Elements for Peanuts

 

Still Need the Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training?

Still Need the Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training?

Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered new dicamba herbicide product formulations for making applications to dicamba tolerant cotton and soybean crops. As a result, many states were overwhelmed with drift complaints regarding sensitive crops. This led to the 2018 EPA announcement requiring that anyone who wishes to apply dicamba to dicamba tolerant crops MUST participate in an auxin herbicide training before making applications in 2018.

[warning]This training is required of anyone applying newer dicamba products registered for use on dicamba tolerant cotton and soybeans.[/warning]

Product examples include XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan. Applicators using older dicamba formulations in other crops (corn, forages, small grains, sorghum, and turf) can still apply dicamba products without having this training but thoseproducts CANNOT be used on the dicamba tolerant crops. If you have questions regarding the use of these products or if you need the training, call your local Extension Office before making any applications.

On March 16, Extension Offices from across the state hosted an online two-hour dicamba training, which was broadcasted live from Gainesville. This training was overseen by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), who determined that the CEU form received from completion of this training would serve as the official documentation of attendance. If applicators desire to use the form for CEUs towards renewal of their pesticide license, they are required to keep an additional copy in their possession as proof of completing the dicamba training.

The training was recorded live and made available to all participating Extension Offices (see below). If you plan to make dicamba applications to dicamba tolerant cotton or soybean, you MUST complete this training before making any applications. The training is not required before planting dicamba genetics, but without the training dicamba cannot be sprayed on the crop. If you plan to spray the crop with dicamba, or want the weed control option later in the season, the training is mandatory.

[important]The recorded training has been made available to all participating Extension Offices. Applicators are required to watch it at the Extension Office, where it can be proctored by an agent who is a certified CEU provider and can issue/sign the CEU form. There are no exceptions, you must watch the training at an Extension Office. In the Panhandle, participating Extension Offices with access to the training include: Calhoun, Escambia, Gadsden, Holmes, Jefferson, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton, and Washington Counties. Contact information for the different offices can be found using the following link: Florida County Extension Offices.[/important]

 

Permit Required for AgLogic Nematicide Use in Cotton and Peanuts

Permit Required for AgLogic Nematicide Use in Cotton and Peanuts

Ethan Carter, Regional Crop IPM Agent, and Zane Grabau, UF/IFAS Nematologist

Newly registered for Florida, AgLogic 15GG (gypsum formulation) is a granular nematicide available for use in Florida cotton and peanut. The active ingredient in this product is aldicarb, which you may remember was the active ingredient in Temik.

[warning]Producers who plan to utilize this product for the upcoming 2018 crop season are REQUIRED to obtain an aldicarb permit through FDACS PRIOR to any applications being made. A separate permit application is required for each field where aldicarb will be applied.[/warning]

The one page permit application for applying aldicarb in Florida can be downloaded here. Once filled out, the permit application needs to be submitted to Tamara James, FDACS by email or fax (850) 617-7895. The website for submitting applications on the existing Temik page is currently being updated, and will be functioning in the near future.

Aside from the aldicarb permit, producers will also need to be in possession of a restricted use pesticide license, and strictly follow the label instructions for this product. See label for mandatory minimum distances between the nearest well and aldicarb application, as these distances vary based on soil type and well casing.

[important]Grazing restrictions are also associated with this product.  Peanut hay and vines cannot be fed to livestock following AgLogic application. [/important]

This granular product should be applied in-furrow at planting, and may be followed by a post-emergence application before peanut pegging or cotton squaring. The post-emergence application must be side-dressed in an open furrow, and immediately covered with soil. Maximum application rates are 7 lbs./acre at planting for both crops, 5 lbs./acre post-emergence for cotton, and 10 lbs./acre post-emergence for peanut.

Aldicarb Permit Application

Submission contact – Tamara James (email) or fax (850) 617-7895

 

Highlights & Presentations from the 2018 Panhandle Row Crop Short Course

Highlights & Presentations from the 2018 Panhandle Row Crop Short Course

A total of 115 people came out for this year’s Panhandle Row Crop Short Course, from eleven Florida counties, three Georgia counties, and four Alabama counties.

This year’s Panhandle Row Crop Short Course took place on Thursday, March 1, 2018.  Extension Specialists from Florida, Georgia, and Alabama spoke to attendees providing production recommendations and various management tips for row crops farmers. Continuing education units (CEUs) were offered at the event for those with a restricted use pesticide license (Florida, Georgia and Alabama), as well as for Certified Crop Advisors. A total of 115 people came out for this year’s event, that number consists of attendees from eleven Florida counties, three Georgia counties, and four Alabama counties. The event featured nine presentations and a trade show of 17 companies and organizations that provide products and services to the industry.

The focus of the Short Course was primarily on peanut and cotton production, but did overlap to other crops regarding fertility, pest management, and the market outlook. Speaker topics included an update from the Florida Peanut Producers Association, information regarding peanut varieties, cotton varieties, weed management, pest management (insect, disease, nematode), market outlook, and early season fertility. The following recap provides a short summary of what was discussed by each speaker, as well as direct links to download PDF (printable) versions of the presentations given at the event.

Industry Update

Ken Barton, Executive Director of the Florida Peanut Producers Association (FPPA) provided an update on the current status of the peanut industry, along with the goals of the FPPA. The fact that generic base will no longer exist for the 2018 crop year.

Presentation link: Barton – Florida Peanut Producers Update

 

Peanut Variety Selection

Dr. Barry Tillman, UF/IFAS Peanut Breeder provided variety data from trials across several states demonstrating trends in performance. Hypothetical production situations were used to illustrate management decisions based on factors such as planting date, disease pressure, and risk. He also discussed seed availability for different varieties.

Presentation link:  Tillman- Managing Your Favorite Peanut Variety

 

Cotton Variety Performance

On behalf of Dr. David Wright, Ethan Carter, UF/IFAS Regional Crop IPM Extension Agent presented a talk on cotton performance and varieties. Information shared included both data from research stations and on-farm trials across Georgia and Florida. Across many trials at multiple locations, consistently top yielding varieties included ST 6182, DP 1538, DP 1646, CG 3885, and PHY 444.

Presentation link:  Wright- Making Replant Decisions for Cotton and Peanut

 

Nematode Management

Dr. Zane Grabau, UF/IFAS Crop Nematologist discussed nematicide options available to crop farmers, some new to the market and others returning. He presented data from a series of cotton and peanut trials that took place on research stations, as well as two on-farm trials in Jackson County. The Jackson County on-farm trials were looking at Velum Total, Telone II and AgLogic 15GG. Once again, Telone II is expected to be in short supply and difficult to find. The active ingredient in AgLogic 15GG is aldicarb, the same as Temik, and a permit will need to be obtained from FDACS for those interested in its use.

Presentation link:  Grabau- Nematode Management

 

Crop Disease Management

Dr. Nicholas Dufault, UF/IFAS Crop Pathologist focused his talk on the performance of peanut fungicides. It is important to know which pathogen you are treating, and confidently select an effective product for its control. Chlorothalonil, a back bone of many spray programs will be in short supply this year, and a higher price can be expected.

Presentation link:  Dufault- Crop Disease Management

 

 Herbicide Use/Weed Management

Dr. Steve Li, Auburn Weed Specialist discussed the control of hard to kill weeds in crop systems. He also discussed auxin herbicides and the newly labeled Enlist One for Florida. Good weed control can be achieved using some older products as well as the new ones, but it is important to continue using soil herbicides.

Presentation link:  Li – Herbicide Use/Weed Management

 

Crop Market Outlook

Dr. Adam Rabinowitz, UGA Economist provided a detailed analysis of the crop commodity markets. He covered several commodities, their utilization within the market, and inputs. Understanding what factors drive the market and the projected revenues/costs associated with growing different crops will allow producers to make informed decisions. When it comes to being well versed with your farm’s expenditures and income potential, this year is no exception. With generic base gone for the 2018 year, growers need to familiarize themselves with the conversion options available and do what is best for their specific situation.

Presentation link:  Rabinowitz- Crop Market Outlook

 

Caterpillars in Crops

Dr. Silvana Moraes, new UF/IFAS Entomologist discussed her research program and the goals of her work. She talked about the seasonal occurrence of pests that affect cotton and peanut, as well as their specific life cycles and potential control measures. Identification is crucial for insect control, controlling corn earworms vs armyworms or soybean loopers vs velvetbean caterpillars will affect your product options and can impact price.

Presentation Link:  Moraes – Caterpillars in Crops

 

Early Season Fertility

Dr. Michael Mulvaney, UF/IFAS Cropping Systems Specialist spoke on the importance of soil testing and how soil health relates directly to the early season fertility of the crop. Recognizing the nutritional need of a crop, and being able to identify symptoms of deficiency are key in maintaining a healthy field. With delayed or skipped gypsum applications in peanut, prioritize fields with <250 ppm Ca (500 lbs Ca/ac).

Presentation link:  Mulvaney- Early Season Fertility

 

Sponsors and Trade Show Exhibitors

These 17 companies and organizations that provide products and services to crop farmers in the region took part in the Trade Show and made lunch possible for not only this event, but also the upcoming Peanut Field Day in August.

Upcoming Events

There are a number of upcoming educational events taking place across the Florida Panhandle. Watch the newsletter for promotional materials regarding these events, or call the Extension Office in your county for more information.