In this Issue:
  • The Impact of Shade on Cattle Performance in the Florida Panhandle
  • New Bermudagrass Stem Maggot Management Guide from UGA
  • December Cattle & Forage Management Reminders
  • Do the Math First Before Purchasing Feed to Supplement Hay
  • 2017 Average Farm Land Rent and Labor Rates
  • Weed of the Week: Black Cherry
  • Friday Feature: Protecting Hay Quality at Harvest Part 2
  • Weed of the Week: Bracken Fern
  • Friday Feature: Variable Rate Feeding & a Cow Joke
  • Winter Pastures Looking Yellow? It Could be a Sulfur Deficiency
  • Forage & Pasture

    The Impact of Shade on Cattle Performance in the Florida Panhandle

    Lautaro Rostoll, Jose Dubeux, and Nicolas DiLorenzo, University of Florida NFREC

    Cattle producers in the Southeast have often asked questions about the need for shade, and its impact on performance.  While plenty of information is available on heat stress on cattle fed finishing diets in the Midwest, surprisingly not as much information is available …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/12/01/the-impact-of-shade-on-cattle-performance-in-the-florida-panhandle/

    New Bermudagrass Stem Maggot Management Guide from UGA

    Dennis Hancock, UGA State Forage Extension Specialist

    Have you noticed bronzing on your bermudagrass? It may appear as drought or frost-damaged fields, but it could also be the bermudagrass stem maggot.

    Since the first appearance in Georgia in 2010, producers have been wondering how to combat this pest. If this includes you, check out UGA’s most …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/12/01/new-bermudagrass-stem-maggot-management-guide-from-uga/

    December Cattle & Forage Management Reminders

    UF/IFAS Beef Cattle & Forage Specialists, and County Extension Agents serving the Florida Panhandle developed a basic management calendar for cattle producers in the region.  The purpose of this calendar is to provide reminders for management techniques with similar timing to those used at the North Florida Research and Education Center’s Beef Unit, near Marianna, …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/12/01/december-cattle-forage-management-reminders/

    Do the Math First Before Purchasing Feed to Supplement Hay

    Two general statements to begin the discussion:

  • Florida grass hay is generally not sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of a lactating brood cow.
  • A fall/early winter calving season is a fairly standard practice in Northwest Florida.
  • These two statements imply that most lactating brood cows will be fed hay this winter that is incapable …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/11/17/do-the-math-first-before-purchasing-feed-to-supplement-hay/

    2017 Average Farm Land Rent and Labor Rates

    Some of the most challenging conversations, in almost any relationship, are the ones about money.  This is certainly true as farmers and landowners negotiate lease agreements, or managers and workers negotiate salaries for the year ahead. It can be pretty challenging to determine a “fair price” to rent a specific farm, or to set the …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/11/17/2017-average-farm-land-rent-and-labor-rates/

    Weed of the Week: Black Cherry

    Black Cherry is common across the southern half of the United States. Mature trees span from 50 to 90 feet tall with an oval silhouette shape, and low branches that normally droop to the ground. This native tree is commonly used for landscaping but can also be  found in pastures and along fence lines.

    The …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/11/17/weed-of-the-week-black-cherry/

    Friday Feature: Protecting Hay Quality at Harvest Part 2

    In early October we shared the first two videos in the “A Cut Above the Rest” video series produced by Massey Ferguson, that features Dennis Hancock, UGA Forage Specialist.  This week we share the third and fourth videos in this series that provides helpful tips for protecting the quality of your hay at harvest.

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/11/17/friday-feature-protecting-hay-quality-at-harvest-part-2/

    Weed of the Week: Bracken Fern

    Bracken Fern is a common perennial fern that is found across the United States. Its ability to grow well is both dry and moist soils, as well as along tree lines, in wooded areas, and around buildings, make it a well-adapted species. While all parts of the fern are toxic, the rhizomes are most toxic, …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/11/03/weed-of-the-week-bracken-fern/

    Friday Feature: Variable Rate Feeding & a Cow Joke

    This week’s featured video was produced by Growing America’s Chad Etheridge, who came over to Marianna last week to make a video about something I have a real passion about.  This year farmers and ranchers were forced to harvest over-mature, low quality hay because there were very few windows of dry weather this summer.  …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/11/03/friday-feature-variable-rate-feeding-a-cow-joke/

    Winter Pastures Looking Yellow? It Could be a Sulfur Deficiency

    Cheryl Mackowiak, UF/IFAS NFREC Soils Specialist

    As producers near the end of cover crop and cool-season forage planting in the Southeastern U.S., it is time to focus on fertilization.  Depending upon your state, extension professionals have establish guidelines for how much and when to apply nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) fertilizers to …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/10/27/winter-pastures-looking-yellow-it-could-be-a-sulfur-deficiency/

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