In this Issue:
  • Call 811 Before You Dig or Farm Near Buried Utility and Pipelines
  • Protecting Pollinators from Pesticides: Everyone Plays a Part
  • Weed of the Week: Showy Crotalaria
  • Weed of the Week: Tropical Soda Apple
  • Snails have Invaded the Western Panhandle
  • Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles
  • Glystar Plus now Labeled for Perennial Peanut in Florida
  • Has Excess Rain Affected your Cotton Fertility Program?
  • Mosquito Control Can Be As Close As A Farm Pond
  • Cogongrass Spreading in the Panhandle
  • Natural Resources

    Call 811 Before You Dig or Farm Near Buried Utility and Pipelines

    Today, August 11 is “National 811 Day,” so it is only fitting to share an Ag-Safety reminder to “Call or Click Before You Dig.”

    There are pipelines and utility lines buried all over the place in rural areas.  In fact, there are more than 1,250 miles of gas and hazardous liquid pipelines that …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/11/call-811-before-you-dig-or-farm/

    Protecting Pollinators from Pesticides: Everyone Plays a Part

    Overview

    On January 12, 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released its final Policy to Mitigate the Acute Risk to Bees from Pesticide Products.  This policy outlines EPA’s label statements designed to mitigate acute risks to bees from pesticides.  The recent UF/IFAS publication, Pesticide Labeling: Protection of Pollinators, provides an in-depth look at …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/04/protecting-pollinators-from-pesticides-everyone-plays-a-part/

    Weed of the Week: Showy Crotalaria

    Commonly known as Showy Rattlebox, Showy Crotalaria is a fast growing summer annual that germinates in early spring and flowers in late summer. As a member of the legume family, it was brought to the United States to be used as a cover crop to help set nitrogen in dry sandy soils. Showy Crotalaria is …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/04/weed-of-the-week-showy-crotalaria/

    Weed of the Week: Tropical Soda Apple

    This week’s featured weed is tropical soda apple, a serious weed problem in many pastures and natural areas of Florida.  This invasive weed is very prolific and can infest a pasture in a very short time.  Its fruit are toxic to goats, and the unpalatable thorny leaves results in reduced forage production and lower stocking …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/28/weed-of-the-week-tropical-soda-apple/

    Snails have Invaded the Western Panhandle

    Snails have invaded some local areas throughout northern Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties this summer. The snails are tan colored, high and conical, with mature snails about ¾ to 1-inch long. They have been found in extremely high numbers in some crop fields, including corn, cotton, and peanuts, in home gardens, and around farm buildings …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/snails-have-invaded-the-western-panhandle/

    Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles

    Ambrosia beetles are known for attacking various woody plants, causing some limb and stem dieback and sometimes plant death. There are at least 30 species of ambrosia beetles in Florida, several of which are non-native.

    Typically ambrosia beetles have a symbiotic relationship with a fungus which the beetles carry in their bodies. When the beetles …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/laurel-wilt-fungus-raffaelea-lauricola-reflects-the-spread-of-redbay-ambrosia-beetles/

    Glystar Plus now Labeled for Perennial Peanut in Florida

    Brent Sellers, UF/IFAS Extension Weed Specialist

    Over the past several years, perennial peanut producers have encountered weeds that are much more difficult to control with the standard broadleaf and grass herbicides such as 2,4-D amine and Impose (imazapic). We had observed perennial peanut tolerance to glyphosate when attempting to maintain our research plot …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/30/glystar-plus-now-labeled-for-perennial-peanut-in-florida/

    Has Excess Rain Affected your Cotton Fertility Program?

    Michael J. Mulvaney, UF/IFAS Soil Specialist & Glen Harris, UGA Soil Specialist

    If you’re like me, you’re watching this rain and wondering where your nutrients are in the soil profile.  The Jay FAWN station has recorded almost 20″ of rain so far in June.  Last week we talked about peanut gypsum …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/30/has-excess-rain-affected-your-cotton-fertility-program/

    Mosquito Control Can Be As Close As A Farm Pond

    The consistent and ample rains of late over Florida’s Panhandle assure enough moisture is available for row crop production and development, and forage growth. It has also minimized, if not eliminated, the need for irrigation and its associated cost.

    As with anything good, there is always an associated negative component which cannot be avoided. In …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/30/mosquito-control-can-be-as-close-as-a-farm-pond/

    Cogongrass Spreading in the Panhandle

    A recent increase in the spread of cogongrass has landowners scrambling to find ways to stop this invasive plant. There are ways to combat cogongrass, with positive identification and persistent treatment being paramount.

    Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) is found all over the world. In the U.S, it is primarily found in the southeast. Cogongrass was purposely …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/23/cogongrass-on-the-move-in-the-panhandle/

    Older posts «

    » Newer posts