Friday Feature:  Farm Dog of the Year

Friday Feature: Farm Dog of the Year

Woody, 2019 Farm Bureau Farm Dog of the Year

Joe Sheeran and Woody, 2019 Farm Bureau Farm Dog of the Year.  Credit: Nestle Purina PetCare

This week’s featured video was shared at the 2019 National Farm Bureau Convention in New Orleans, Louisiana.  An Australian Shepherd owned by Joe Sheeran, Texas was recognized as the 2019 Farm Dog of the Year.  A panel of expert judges reviewed more than 90 nominations to select the Farm Dog of the Year, based on helpfulness to the farmer and the role dogs played to make life better on the farm.

Woody, an Australian shepherd owned by Texas Farm Bureau members Joe and Mary Sheeran, is the winner of the 2019 Farm Bureau Farm Dog of the Year award. The American Farm Bureau Federation, with support from Nestlé Purina, recognized Woody and four runners-up at AFBF’s 100th Annual Convention.  Woody, the grand prize winner of the 2019 Farm Bureau Farm Dog of the Year award, won a year’s worth of Purina dog food, $5,000 in prize money, a trophy plate and a basket of Purina products. American Farm Bureau

Do you have a great farm dog you think is worthy of nomination next year?  Here is a link to the rules that were provided for the dogs that were nominated last fall: Farm Bureau Farm Dog of the Year Contest  

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across an interesting or humorous video, or a new product innovation related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

Friday Feature:  Peterson Bothers’ Farmer Rock Anthem

Friday Feature: Peterson Bothers’ Farmer Rock Anthem

Those famous Kansas farm boys, the Peterson Bothers, have created another parody video called Farmers Rock Anthem, which is a parody of the popular song ” Party Rock Anthem.”  The Peterson Brothers have published a number of these videos to tell the positive story of farming to people who really don’t understand anything about the industry.  They may seem a little silly, but their strategy is working.  This video was released back on December 1 and already has revived 371 thousand views in a little more than one month.  Check out their latest video, and share it through your social media account to your friends.  These young guys are working hard to tell the good story of modern farming in a way that people from their generation will enjoy.

 

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across an interesting or humorous video, or a new product innovation related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

Friday Feature: Knickers the Giant 6’4″ Australian Steer

Friday Feature: Knickers the Giant 6’4″ Australian Steer

This week’s featured video was published by Today Tonight to share the story of Knickers, the giant 6’4″ tall, 3,000 pound Australian steer that has become a social media sensation.  Knickers is used as a “Coach” or lead steer for a stocker cattle operation in Australia.  While he is not quite large enough to break the world record (6’7″), his story is pretty interesting.  Check out the video!

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across an interesting or humorous video, or a new product innovation related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

Friday Feature:  Farm Bureau’s This Farm CARES Program

Friday Feature: Farm Bureau’s This Farm CARES Program

This week’s video was produced by Florida Farm Bureau to showcase their “This Farm CARES” program.  CARES is an acronym for the County Alliance for Responsible Environmental Stewardship Program.  This recognition is given out to Florida farmers who are doing an outstanding job implementing Best Management Practices (BMPs) to protect water quality and conserve natural resources.

Since 2001, the Florida Farm Bureau Federation has recognized nearly 800 Florida farm families throughout the state for their commitment to protecting natural resources through the CARES program. CARES, also known as the County Alliance for Responsible Environmental Stewardship, not only honors our farmers/ranchers through public recognitions but also through consumer outreach and education to teach all Floridians how farmers/ranchers protect the environment every single day. Caring is their calling and Farm Bureau is proud to tell their story! #ThisFarmCARES

Florida Farm Bureau Federation’s CARES Program from the Florida Farm Bureau Federation.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across an interesting or humorous video, or a new product innovation related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

Friday Feature:  Robot Cowboys

Friday Feature: Robot Cowboys

Cattle pushing robot being tested at a Cargill packing plant. Credit: Feedstuffs

This week’s featured video was produced by Feedstuffs Magazine to highlight an innovation being pilot tested at a Cargill cattle packing plant.  They are evaluating remote control robotic cowboys that can move finished cattle though the pens and into the packing house.

Cargill has developed an industry-first robotic cattle driver aimed at improving animal welfare and employee safety. The robots are designed to move cattle from pens to the harvest area, reducing stress to the animals by minimizing their proximity to human activity. Employees operate the robots from a catwalk located above the pens, reducing safety risks by keeping those who work in the cattle yard portion of processing plants at a greater distance from the 1300-pound animals. Source: Cargill

Before you roll your eyes, and make fun, check out the video.  It really is a fairly practical use of robotic technology.  It would be a whole lot easier to hire employees that can operate a video game-type remote control than to find enough workers who understand cattle handling to work three shifts at large packing plants.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across an interesting or humorous video, or a new product innovation related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo

 

Friday Feature:  Corn that Acquires Its Own Nitrogen

Friday Feature: Corn that Acquires Its Own Nitrogen

This week’s featured video was published by the University of California – Davis to share the results of a remarkable scientific discovery.  Researchers from UC Davis, the University of Wisconsin–Madison, and Mars, Incorporated have identified a native variety of Mexican corn that can fix nitrogen from the atmosphere, instead of relying totally on synthetic fertilizers.

A public-private collaboration of researchers have identified varieties of tropical corn from Mexico, that can acquire a significant amount of the nitrogen they need from the air by cooperating with bacteria.  To do so, the corn secretes copious globs of mucus-like gel out of arrays of aerial roots along its stalk. This gel harbors bacteria that convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form usable by the plant, a process called nitrogen fixation. The corn can acquire 30 to 80 percent of its nitrogen in this way, but the effectiveness depends on environmental factors like humidity and rain.  Scientists have long sought corn that could fix nitrogen, with the goal of reducing the crop’s high demand for artificial fertilizers, which are energy intensive, expensive and polluting. Further research is required to determine if the trait can be bred into commercial cultivars of corn, the world’s most productive cereal crop.  Source: Corn that acquires its own nitrogen identified, reducing need for fertilizer

Thanks to Judy Biss, UF/IFAS Extension Calhoun County, for sending in this video to share.

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If you enjoyed this video, you might want to check out the featured videos from previous weeks:  Friday Features

If you come across an interesting or humorous video, or a new product innovation related to agriculture, please send in a link, so we can share it with our readers. Send video links to:  Doug Mayo