In this Issue:
  • Invasive Species Workshop and Air Potato Challenge – June 6
  • Grass Carp – A Biological Control to Manage Pond Weeds
  • Featured Video: Chemical Control of Chinese Privet
  • Weed of the Week: Chinese Tallow
  • Weed of the Week: Showy Crotalaria
  • Weed of the Week: Tropical Soda Apple
  • Snails have Invaded the Western Panhandle
  • Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles
  • Cogongrass Spreading in the Panhandle
  • Disease Alert: Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllids found in the Panhandle
  • Invasive Species

    Invasive Species Workshop and Air Potato Challenge – June 6

    June 6th is a great day to learn about all types of invasive species that threaten natural areas in Northwest Florida!  The UF/IFAS Extension Bay County office will have multiple educational exhibits with living samples of species of concern from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. central time, on Wednesday, June 6th. This is a multi-agency …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/05/25/invasive-species-workshop-and-air-potato-challenge-june-6/

    Grass Carp – A Biological Control to Manage Pond Weeds

    Florida has hundreds of aquatic plant species, and they are an often-overlooked feature of Florida’s landscape.  Overlooked that is, until the growth of non-native (even some native) species interferes with use of our waters.  Some aquatic plant species can become problematic in Florida waters when their growth interferes with fishing, …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/05/18/grass-carp-a-biological-control-to-manage-invasive-pond-weeds/

    Featured Video: Chemical Control of Chinese Privet

    This week’s featured video was produced by Alabama Extension to show the results of a Chinese Privet chemical control demonstration.  This video shares the results for three techniques used for privet control: foliar (spraying leaves), cut stump, and basal bark treatment.  There is also a companion fact sheet that provides more details on controlling …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/02/02/featured-video-chemical-control-of-chinese-privet/

    Weed of the Week: Chinese Tallow

    Chinese Tallow is an invasive tree that is now well established in the Southern United States. It first became a concern in natural areas, due to its invasive nature and adverse effect on native communities of plants. Chinese tallow was first recognized as an issue in the Carolinas in the 1970s, and since has spread through …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/01/26/weed-of-the-week-chinese-tallow/

    Weed of the Week: Showy Crotalaria

    Commonly known as Showy Rattlebox, Showy Crotalaria is a fast growing summer annual that germinates in early spring and flowers in late summer. As a member of the legume family, it was brought to the United States to be used as a cover crop to help set nitrogen in dry sandy soils. Showy Crotalaria is …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/04/weed-of-the-week-showy-crotalaria/

    Weed of the Week: Tropical Soda Apple

    This week’s featured weed is tropical soda apple, a serious weed problem in many pastures and natural areas of Florida.  This invasive weed is very prolific and can infest a pasture in a very short time.  Its fruit are toxic to goats, and the unpalatable thorny leaves results in reduced forage production and lower stocking …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/28/weed-of-the-week-tropical-soda-apple/

    Snails have Invaded the Western Panhandle

    Snails have invaded some local areas throughout northern Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties this summer. The snails are tan colored, high and conical, with mature snails about ¾ to 1-inch long. They have been found in extremely high numbers in some crop fields, including corn, cotton, and peanuts, in home gardens, and around farm buildings …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/snails-have-invaded-the-western-panhandle/

    Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles

    Ambrosia beetles are known for attacking various woody plants, causing some limb and stem dieback and sometimes plant death. There are at least 30 species of ambrosia beetles in Florida, several of which are non-native.

    Typically ambrosia beetles have a symbiotic relationship with a fungus which the beetles carry in their bodies. When the beetles …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/laurel-wilt-fungus-raffaelea-lauricola-reflects-the-spread-of-redbay-ambrosia-beetles/

    Cogongrass Spreading in the Panhandle

    A recent increase in the spread of cogongrass has landowners scrambling to find ways to stop this invasive plant. There are ways to combat cogongrass, with positive identification and persistent treatment being paramount.

    Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) is found all over the world. In the U.S, it is primarily found in the southeast. Cogongrass was purposely …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/23/cogongrass-on-the-move-in-the-panhandle/

    Disease Alert: Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllids found in the Panhandle

    F. Iriarte, X. Martini, M. Paret, UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) Quincy, and E. Lovestrand, UF/IFAS Franklin Co. Extension

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Yellow Shoot or Citrus Greening is a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by a bacteria named Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterium is transmitted …

    Continue reading »

    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/03/03/disease-alert-citrus-greening-and-asian-citrus-psyllids-found-in-the-panhandle/

    Older posts «