In this Issue:
  • Managing Grazing Land to Enhance Bee Habitat
  • Protecting Fall Vegetable Crops after the Hurricane
  • New Insect and Mite Control Guide for Florida Cotton Growers
  • Silverleaf Whiteflies in Panhandle Cotton
  • New UF/IFAS Entomologist is Surveying Insect Pests in Panhandle Row Crops
  • A Tiny Wasp to Fight the Asian Citrus Psyllid
  • Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles
  • Beneficial Parasitic Wasps in Peanuts
  • Scout Soybeans for Kudzu Bugs and Redbanded Stink Bugs
  • Mosquito Control Can Be As Close As A Farm Pond
  • Insects

    Managing Grazing Land to Enhance Bee Habitat

    Jose Dubeux and Liza Garcia, University of Florida – North Florida Research and Education Center

    Improved forages are not only good for livestock, but they can also help feed bees! Managing grasslands to enhance bee habitat requires similar management practices to those needed to enhance pasture for grazing livestock. Diversification of pasture species, management …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/10/06/managing-grazing-land-to-enhance-bee-habitat/

    Protecting Fall Vegetable Crops after the Hurricane

    As if the fall season wasn’t challenging enough from a pest and disease perspective, throw in a hurricane and it gets much worse. Luckily, the storm missed most of the Panhandle. Tomato and cucurbit producing areas in Gadsden and Jackson counties likely saw the greatest impacts from Hurricane Irma. The biggest problem was the wind …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/09/15/protecting-fall-vegetable-crops-after-the-hurricane/

    New Insect and Mite Control Guide for Florida Cotton Growers

    Joe Funderburk, Professor of Entomology, NFREC Quincy

    A UF/IFAS EDIS fact sheet is now available entitled “Insect and Mite Integrated Pest Management in Florida Cotton” by Joe Funderburk, Nicole Casuso, Norman Leppla, and Michael Donahue. The guide provides growers with up-to-date information on scouting and managing insects and mites in their fields.

    The …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/09/08/new-insect-and-mite-control-guide-for-florida-cotton-growers/

    Silverleaf Whiteflies in Panhandle Cotton

    Sliverleaf whiteflies (SLWF), also known as sweet potato whiteflies, are a major pest in many cropping systems. The SLWF has a broad feeding range of over 600 host plants, which includes ornamental, vegetable, and field crops. This season, large populations of silverleaf whiteflies have been reported in in cotton in Georgia, Alabama, and now Florida’s Panhandle.

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/25/silverleaf-whiteflies-in-panhandle-cotton/

    New UF/IFAS Entomologist is Surveying Insect Pests in Panhandle Row Crops

    Silvana Paula-Moraes began working in the fall of 2016 at the  UF/IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center (WFREC) based in Jay, Florida. Originally from Brazil, Dr. Moraes completed her PhD in Nebraska.  Her research has been dedicated to address several aspects of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and Insect Resistance Management (IRM) for …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/11/new-ufifas-entomologist-is-surveying-insect-pests-in-panhandle-row-crops/

    A Tiny Wasp to Fight the Asian Citrus Psyllid

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Fig 1), the carrier of the causative agent of citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB), is certainly the most devastating pest in citrus worldwide. Since it was first spotted in Florida in 1998, the Asian citrus psyllid has spread across the state, and starting in 2005, the first cases of HLB were …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/a-tiny-wasp-to-fight-the-asian-citrus-psyllid/

    Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles

    Ambrosia beetles are known for attacking various woody plants, causing some limb and stem dieback and sometimes plant death. There are at least 30 species of ambrosia beetles in Florida, several of which are non-native.

    Typically ambrosia beetles have a symbiotic relationship with a fungus which the beetles carry in their bodies. When the beetles …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/laurel-wilt-fungus-raffaelea-lauricola-reflects-the-spread-of-redbay-ambrosia-beetles/

    Beneficial Parasitic Wasps in Peanuts

    Insect management tends to focus on pests that cause damage and reduce yields, but one aspect of integrated pest management (IPM) includes the knowledge of beneficial insects that naturally control those pests.  In peanuts, there are several different beneficial parasitoids that can be found preying on pest insects in the southern U.S.  A parasitoid is …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/07/beneficial-parasitic-wasps-in-peanuts/

    Scout Soybeans for Kudzu Bugs and Redbanded Stink Bugs

    After a mild winter, with relatively few nights below freezing, it should be no surprise that insect populations are spiking early. One example of this is armyworms, which began showing up in early-mid June across areas of Jackson County, a pest typically found later in July.  In early June, soybean pests have begun to appear …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/30/scout-soybeans-for-kudzu-bugs-and-redbanded-stink-bugs/

    Mosquito Control Can Be As Close As A Farm Pond

    The consistent and ample rains of late over Florida’s Panhandle assure enough moisture is available for row crop production and development, and forage growth. It has also minimized, if not eliminated, the need for irrigation and its associated cost.

    As with anything good, there is always an associated negative component which cannot be avoided. In …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/06/30/mosquito-control-can-be-as-close-as-a-farm-pond/

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