In this Issue:
  • Silverleaf Whiteflies in Panhandle Cotton
  • Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles
  • Disease Alert: Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllids found in the Panhandle
  • USDA Confirms Screwworms in the Florida Keys
  • Conditions are Favorable for Bacterial Spot in Fall Tomatoes
  • Soybean Rust found in Jackson County Sentinel Plot
  • Bermudagrass Stem Maggot Population Building in the Panhandle
  • Season’s First Incidence of Cotton Corynespora Target Spot Confirmed in Santa Rosa County
  • Rindworms: A “Complex” Pest of Melons
  • Buckeye Rot in Tomatoes
  • Pest Alert

    Silverleaf Whiteflies in Panhandle Cotton

    Sliverleaf whiteflies (SLWF), also known as sweet potato whiteflies, are a major pest in many cropping systems. The SLWF has a broad feeding range of over 600 host plants, which includes ornamental, vegetable, and field crops. This season, large populations of silverleaf whiteflies have been reported in in cotton in Georgia, Alabama, and now Florida’s Panhandle.

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/25/silverleaf-whiteflies-in-panhandle-cotton/

    Laurel Wilt Fungus (Raffaelea lauricola) Reflects the Spread of Redbay Ambrosia Beetles

    Ambrosia beetles are known for attacking various woody plants, causing some limb and stem dieback and sometimes plant death. There are at least 30 species of ambrosia beetles in Florida, several of which are non-native.

    Typically ambrosia beetles have a symbiotic relationship with a fungus which the beetles carry in their bodies. When the beetles …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/07/14/laurel-wilt-fungus-raffaelea-lauricola-reflects-the-spread-of-redbay-ambrosia-beetles/

    Disease Alert: Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllids found in the Panhandle

    F. Iriarte, X. Martini, M. Paret, UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) Quincy, and E. Lovestrand, UF/IFAS Franklin Co. Extension

    Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as Yellow Shoot or Citrus Greening is a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by a bacteria named Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterium is transmitted …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/03/03/disease-alert-citrus-greening-and-asian-citrus-psyllids-found-in-the-panhandle/

    USDA Confirms Screwworms in the Florida Keys

    Screwworms were eradicated from the Southeast back in 1959.  This week USDA’s Animal Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of New World Screwworms Cochliomyia hominivorax in three deer in the Florida Keys.  At this point, APHIS believes the infestation is isolated to Big Pine Key and No Name Key, but the USDA is …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2016/10/07/usda-confirms-screwworms-in-the-florida-keys/

    Conditions are Favorable for Bacterial Spot in Fall Tomatoes

    High temperatures and wet weather produce the perfect conditions for the onset of bacterial spot in tomato fields. The disease is caused by various species of Xanthomonas bacteria. Small spots (1/8 inch) form on leaves, stems, and fruit. The leaf spots are sometimes outlined in yellow. Fruit spots are raised and cause the tomato skin to rupture. …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2015/10/02/conditions-are-favorable-for-bacterial-spot-in-fall-tomatoes/

    Soybean Rust found in Jackson County Sentinel Plot

    Soybean rust (SBR) has been found on the sentinel plot in Jackson County at the Extension Office.  Because these plots are scouted for SBR on a regular basis, the SBR was confirmed very early.  SBR has now been confirmed in Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas in 2015.

    Soybean growers should consider a fungicide application, if …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2015/08/21/soybean-rust-found-in-jackson-county-sentinel-plot/

    Bermudagrass Stem Maggot Population Building in the Panhandle

    Bermudagrass hay farmers need to scout their fields for Bermudagrass Stem Maggots.  I just discovered a big infestation here at the North Florida Research Center (NFREC) which is first one in two years in North Florida that we are aware of.  Also, Liza Garcia has been scouting fields from Jackson County west and also found …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2015/08/07/bermudagrass-stem-maggot-population-building-in-the-panhandle/

    Season’s First Incidence of Cotton Corynespora Target Spot Confirmed in Santa Rosa County

    By:
    Dr. Michael J. Mulvaney
    (Cropping Systems Specialist, University of Florida, IFAS Extension, West Florida Research and Education Center, Jay, FL), Dr. Nicholas S. Dufault (Dept. of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, IFAS Extension, Gainesville, FL), Mike Donahoe (County Director, University of Florida, IFAS Extension, Santa Rosa County, FL)

    This season’s first incidence of …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2015/07/10/seasons-first-incidence-of-cotton-corynespora-target-spot-confirmed-in-santa-rosa-county/

    Rindworms: A “Complex” Pest of Melons

    Matt Lollar, Jackson County Horticulture Agent

    It’s the beginning of melon harvest season in the Panhandle, and rindworms pose a significant threat to fruit quality. Rindworms are an interesting bunch because they are made up of a number of caterpillar species that fall under the classification of the “rindworm complex”. Any moth larva found feeding on …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2015/06/12/rindworms-a-complex-pest-of-melons/

    Buckeye Rot in Tomatoes

    With the recent frequent rains and hot temperatures, the incidence of buckeye rot on field tomatoes has increased in Holmes County, especially on tomatoes that were not planted on plastic mulch.

    This disease in tomatoes is caused by Phytophthora parasitica, and typically shows up on fruit that are touching the soil or in the lower …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2015/06/05/buckeye-rot-in-tomatoes/

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