Alabama Row Crops Shortcourse – December 13-14

Alabama Row Crops Shortcourse – December 13-14

It’s not too late to register for the 2018 Alabama Row Crops Short Course that will be held in Auburn next Thursday, December 13th and Friday December 14th. An event agenda and program updates are available by visiting www.AlabamaCrops.com. Continuing education units and pesticide points will also be available for all attendees. Register online at https://bit.ly/2ObJhYC. There is no registration fee, however, advanced registration is required. Additionally, interested producers may find updates via the Alabama Crops Facebook page or the Alabama Cooperative Extension Facebook page.

 

 

EPA Registrations for Dicamba and Chlorpyrifos Use in Row Crops

EPA Registrations for Dicamba and Chlorpyrifos Use in Row Crops

Traditional cotton with dicamba drift injury on one row vs healthy. Photo - Jay Ferrell

Traditional cotton with dicamba drift injury on one row vs healthy. Photo – Jay Ferrell

The past two months have been life altering for many farmers in the southeast, especially the Florida Panhandle. Hurricane Michael made landfall in the Panhandle on October 10th and left a path of destruction spanning several counties as it continued into Southwest Georgia. With the aftermath of Michael, farmers from Walton to Gadsden counties were left without power and severe damage to crops and equipment.

On October 31st, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it was extending the registration of Dicamba for over-the-top (OTT) use for weed control in transgenic cotton and soybean. Dicamba products approved for use on dicamba-tolerant crops include Engenia (BASF), XtendiMax (Monsanto), and FeXapan (Corteva). This announcement came during a period when much of Jackson and Calhoun Counties, a large cotton producing area, wwere without power. The purpose of this article is to help promote the announcement and raise awareness regarding label changes for products approved for use in Dicamba-tolerant cotton and soybean. Another product to follow is chlorpyrifos, better known as Lorsban, which, depending on outcomes of legal/regulatory proceedings, will likely still be available for use during the 2019 season.

Dicamba

Along with the EPA announcement of the two-year extension in registration of dicamba products used in row crops (now through 2020), new restrictions were revealed that will be integrated into product labels. It is imperative that growers read these labels and understand what these changes mean regarding product use. Dicamba is currently registered for OTT use in cotton and soybean in 34 states, including Florida, Georgia, and Alabama.

In 2019, only restricted use pesticide applicators will be allowed to make applications. The purchase and application of dicamba products used on herbicide tolerant crops will not be permitted by those without a pesticide license and the appropriate category, even under the supervision of a licensed applicator. This means that authorized purchasers on an applicators license will no longer be able to purchase the products, only the certified applicatorthemselves. Everyone must now have their own license if they wish to buy or apply these products registered for use on Dicamba-tolerant crops. Depending on their situation, Florida growers will be required to have a Private Applicator or commercial license with the Row Crop category. Obtaining a license means individuals must pass the two necessary pesticide exams with at least a 70 percent, the Core exam and the category exam (Private or Row crop). Exams can be administered at your local Extension Office, but please call ahead to make an appointment. They can also help you decide which license designation (private or commercial) bests applies to your situation. On top of having a restricted use pesticide license, applicators will also be required to attend a 2019 dicamba training, which will be similar to what was provided in March 2018. All individuals who will want to purchase or apply these products (or want the future option) during the 2019 season will need to attend the new dicamba training, regardless of if they attended the one in 2018. A training date has not yet been selected for Florida, but it will likely be a similar timeframe to the 2018 training. Early spring probably around March, using a web format, broadcast from one central location to participating Extension Offices. The date will be announced once the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) has finalized the specifics, stay in contact with your local Extension Office.

The training will address updates to product labels such as the postemergence application window, number of applications, buffer zones, sensitive areas, application hours, record keeping, spray solution pH, and more.

For more information regarding the 2019 dicamba updates, check out the links below:
Registration of Dicamba for Use on Dicamba-Tolerant Crops
EPA Announces Changes To Dicamba Registration
Dicamba: Moving Forward- 7 Label Changes

Chlorpyrifos

Since 1965 chlorpyrifos has been used as a pesticide in the agricultural sector. It is commonly used as an insecticide in the production of crops such as corn, peanut, and soybean, among others. It is recognizable to most farmers under the brand name Lorsban. Chlorpyrifos is a cholinesterase inhibitor which can cause problems in people exposed to high enough doses. This means that it can overstimulate the nervous system resulting in symptoms such as nausea, dizziness, and confusion.

Since 2000, the EPA has evaluated and modified the use of chlorpyrifos several times. In 2017, the EPA denied a petition requesting to revoke of all pesticide tolerances (residue level allowed in food) for the chemical and for the cancellation of all chlorpyrifos registrations. On August 9, 2018, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ordered the EPA to ban chlorpyrifos within 60 days. In September the EPA appealed the decision, and the Department of Justice asked the Ninth Circuit to reconsider its opinion. Over 100 days have passed since the ban was requested with the 60-day deadline, and it appears that chlorpyrifos will remain available for use until the legal/regulatory proceedings are finished.

For more information regarding the 2019 use of chlorpyrifos or the EPA’s history regarding this product, check out the links below:
Chlorpyrifos
Lorsban should be available for 2019 use, MSU finds

 

West Florida Right of Way and Aquatic Training – December 18

West Florida Right of Way and Aquatic Training – December 18

Do you need to get a right of way or aquatic category pesticide license, or need CEUs to renew your current license? Join us on December 18, 2018 at the Escambia County Extension office located at 3740 Stefani Road, Cantonment, Florida for an informative day that will help prepare you to take the exams which will be offered later in the day. Registration starts at 7:30 with the class starting at 7:45. Cost is $20 and includes lunch. You must pre-register by contacting either Libbie Johnson at 850-475-5230 ext. 109 or Bethany Diamond at 850-675-3107.  CEUs for both categories have been applied for, so if you need Right of Way or Aquatic CEUs, this is a great way to earn them.

Backpack Sprayer in Cogongrass. Photo by Jennifer Bearden

Gadsden Tomato Forum – December 6

Gadsden Tomato Forum – December 6

Freshly picked tomatoes

Freshly picked tomatoes. Credit: UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones

The annual Tomato Forum will be held in Gadsden County on Thursday, December 6, 2018.  The event will be hosted by the North Florida Research and Education Center in Quincy, Florida from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM eastern time.

Topics to be covered will include tomato variety selection, recommended production practices, pest and disease management, and best management practices for water quality protection. Pesticide CEUs will also be provided for restricted pesticide applicators who attend this event.  The annual meeting of the Gadsden County Tomato Growers Association will be held immediately following a sponsored lunch.

Meeting Agenda (All Times Eastern)

  • 8:00 AM     Registration and coffee
  • 8:15     Opening remarks – Dr. Glen Aiken – NFREC Center Director
  • 8:30     Update on Tomato Varieties and Soil-borne Pest Management Strategies – Dr. Josh Freeman, UF NFREC
  • 9:00     Update on Tomato Diseases Management for 2019 Planning – Dr. Mathews Paret, UF NFREC
  • 9:30     Use of Soil Moisture Probes for Irrigation Scheduling Rad Yager – Certified Ag Resources, Camilla, GA
  • 10:00   Break
  • 10:15   Pest Management Updates in Tomatoes – Dr. Xavier Martini, UF NFREC
  • 10:45   Cover Crops for Tomato and Vegetable Production – Dr. Cheryl Mackowiak, UF NFREC
  • 11:15   Drone Research on Melon Disease Assessment Dr. Melanie Kalischuk, UF NFREC Research Associate
  • 11:30   Continuous Water Tracking for Optimum Crop Productivity – Doug Crawford – BMP Logic, Inc.
  • 11:45   BMP’s and Available Cost Share for Producers – Dr. Andrea Albertin – UF Regional Specialized Water Agent
  • 12:00 PM  Q&A and Sponsors Presentation
  • 12:15   Lunch
  • 1:00   Annual meeting of Gadsden Tomato Growers

The meeting location address is:

North Florida Research and Education Center (Quincy)
155 Research Road,
Quincy, FL  32351
 

For more information, contact:
Shep Eubanks
850-647-1108

 

 
 
 
Still Need the Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training?

Still Need the Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training?

Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered new dicamba herbicide product formulations for making applications to dicamba tolerant cotton and soybean crops. As a result, many states were overwhelmed with drift complaints regarding sensitive crops. This led to the 2018 EPA announcement requiring that anyone who wishes to apply dicamba to dicamba tolerant crops MUST participate in an auxin herbicide training before making applications in 2018.

[warning]This training is required of anyone applying newer dicamba products registered for use on dicamba tolerant cotton and soybeans.[/warning]

Product examples include XtendiMax, Engenia, and FeXapan. Applicators using older dicamba formulations in other crops (corn, forages, small grains, sorghum, and turf) can still apply dicamba products without having this training but thoseproducts CANNOT be used on the dicamba tolerant crops. If you have questions regarding the use of these products or if you need the training, call your local Extension Office before making any applications.

On March 16, Extension Offices from across the state hosted an online two-hour dicamba training, which was broadcasted live from Gainesville. This training was overseen by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), who determined that the CEU form received from completion of this training would serve as the official documentation of attendance. If applicators desire to use the form for CEUs towards renewal of their pesticide license, they are required to keep an additional copy in their possession as proof of completing the dicamba training.

The training was recorded live and made available to all participating Extension Offices (see below). If you plan to make dicamba applications to dicamba tolerant cotton or soybean, you MUST complete this training before making any applications. The training is not required before planting dicamba genetics, but without the training dicamba cannot be sprayed on the crop. If you plan to spray the crop with dicamba, or want the weed control option later in the season, the training is mandatory.

[important]The recorded training has been made available to all participating Extension Offices. Applicators are required to watch it at the Extension Office, where it can be proctored by an agent who is a certified CEU provider and can issue/sign the CEU form. There are no exceptions, you must watch the training at an Extension Office. In the Panhandle, participating Extension Offices with access to the training include: Calhoun, Escambia, Gadsden, Holmes, Jefferson, Okaloosa, Santa Rosa, Walton, and Washington Counties. Contact information for the different offices can be found using the following link: Florida County Extension Offices.[/important]

 

2017 Panhandle Row Crop Short Course Presentations and Highlights

2017 Panhandle Row Crop Short Course Presentations and Highlights

The annual Panhandle Row Crop Short Course was hosted by Jackson County Extension on Thursday, March 2, 2017.  Extension Specialists from Florida, Georgia, and Alabama spoke to attendees providing production recommendations and various management tips for row crops farmers. Continuing education units (CEUs) were offered at the event for those with a restricted use pesticide license (Florida, Georgia and Alabama), as well as for Certified Crop Advisors. A total of 119 people turned our for this year’s event, that number is comprised of attendees from nine Florida counties, seven Georgia counties, and four Alabama counties. The event featured nine presentations and a trade show of 27 companies and organizations that provide products and services to the industry.

The focus of the Short Course was primarily on peanut and cotton production, but did overlap other crops regarding fertility, pest management and the market outlook. The speakers provided an update from the Florida Peanut Producers Association, information regarding peanut varieties, herbicides, replant decisions, pest management, market outlook, and early season fertility. Many of the people who attended asked about copies of the presentations. The following recap provides a short summary of what was discussed, as well as direct links to download PDF (printable) versions of the presentations given at the event.

Industry Update

Ken Barton, Executive Director of the Florida Peanut Producers Association (FPPA) provided an update on the current status of the peanut industry, along with the goals of the FPPA.

Barton Florida Peanut Producers Update

 

Managing Your Favorite Peanut Variety

Dr. Barry Tillman, UF/IFAS Peanut Breeder provided variety data from trials across several states (Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina) demonstrating trends in performance. Hypothetical production situations were used to illustrate management decisions based on factors such as planting date, disease pressure, and risk.

      Tillman Managing Your Favorite Peanut Variety

 

Generic Herbicides

Dr. Ramon Leon, UF/IFAS Weed Specialist discussed the use of generic herbicides. It is important to always be aware of the amount of active ingredient listed for a product and its formulation, and that the success or failure of a herbicide can be attributed to several causes.

      Leon Generic Herbicides

 

Making Replant Decisions for Cotton and Peanut

Dr. David Wright, UF/IFAS Agronomist discussed how to determine if replanting a field is beneficial. How much of a stand is adequate and when is replanting necessary? These questions among others are outlined and answered regarding peanut and cotton.

     Wright Making Replant Decisions for Cotton and Peanut

 

2,4-D and Dicamba Update (as of 3/2/17)

Dr. Ramon Leon, UF/IFAS Weed Specialist discussed the new herbicide technologies available for use in 2017. Enlist Duo, Engenia, FeXapan, and XtendiMax all lack Florida registration as of March 2, 2017 (stay tuned for future updates). Therefore, growers will be required to follow both the EPA label and Florida Organ-Auxin Rule for these products. When the two have conflicting information (i.e. buffer distance between crops, wind speed, etc.), whichever is more restrictive should be used. He outlined how several labels stand as of 3/2/17, however it is IMPORTANT that this presentation not be substituted for the product labels. Always look up the most current label, as they are in a state of transition and are still changing.

     Leon 2,4-D Dicamba Crops Update 2017

 

Crop Disease Management

Dr. Nicholas Dufault, UF/IFAS Crop Pathologist focused his talk on the performance of peanut fungicides. It is important to know which pathogen you are treating, and confidently select an effective product for its control.

     Dufault Crop Disease Management

 

2017 Crop Market Outlook

Dr. Adam Rabinowitz, UGA Economist provided a detailed analysis of the crop commodity markets. He covered several commodities, their utilization within the market, inputs, and the potential use of the UGA Crop Comparison Tool. Understanding what factors drive the market and the projected revenues/costs associated with growing different crops will allow producers to make informed decisions this year.

     Rabinowitz Crop Market Outlook

 

Cotton Insect Management and Control for 2017

Dr. Ron Smith, Auburn Entomologist discussed the seasonal occurrence of pests that affect cotton and their control measures. With new and emerging pests each year, accurate pest identification prior to pesticide applications is key for attaining adequate insect control.

     Smith Cotton Insect Management and Control for 2017

 

Early Season Fertility

Dr. Michael Mulvaney, UF/IFAS Cropping Systems Specialist elaborated on early season fertility in corn, cotton, and peanut. Recognizing the nutritional need of a crop, and being able to identify symptoms of deficiency are key in maintaining a healthy field.

     Mulvaney Early Season Fertility

 

Sponsors and Trade Show Exhibitors

 

These 27 companies and organizations that provide products and services to crop farmers in the region took part in the Trade Show.

Upcoming Events

There are a number of upcoming crop educational events that are taking place largely in the Florida Panhandle. Watch the newsletter for promotional materials regarding these events, or call the Extension office for the listed county for more information.