In this Issue:
  • Atmospheric Temperature Inversions – Why Are They Important To Farmers?
  • Still Need the Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training?
  • Gulf County Core Pesticide Safety Training – April 11
  • Fungicide Options for Peanut Producers due to the Expected Chlorothalonil Shortage in 2018
  • Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training – March 16
  • Insecticide Applications Can Inadvertently Cause Citrus Mite Outbreaks
  • Input Requested for a UF Study on Farm Waste Management
  • Protecting Fall Vegetable Crops after the Hurricane
  • Weed of the Week: Coffee Senna
  • Weed of the Week: Southern Sandbur
  • Pesticide

    Atmospheric Temperature Inversions – Why Are They Important To Farmers?

    Farmers and ranchers must manage traditional business practices to be successful, but they also deal with the many challenges of ever changing weather.  Rain, wind, and temperature are important and obvious aspects of weather that producers track on a daily basis, but there are other, not so obvious weather features that affect operational management as …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/04/06/atmospheric-temperature-inversions-why-are-they-important-to-farmers/

    Still Need the Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training?

    Last year, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registered new dicamba herbicide product formulations for making applications to dicamba tolerant cotton and soybean crops. As a result, many states were overwhelmed with drift complaints regarding sensitive crops. This led to the 2018 EPA announcement requiring that anyone who wishes to apply dicamba to dicamba tolerant …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/04/06/still-need-the-mandatory-dicamba-resistant-crop-training/

    Gulf County Core Pesticide Safety Training – April 11

    All licensed pesticide applicators must accrue core plus category CEUs to maintain their license for renewal.  A less popular option is re-taking the exams to keep the certification. On April 11, 2018, applicators have the opportunity to earn all the necessary core CEUs to renew their license at one training session.  The training …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/03/16/gulf-county-core-pesticide-training-april-11/

    Fungicide Options for Peanut Producers due to the Expected Chlorothalonil Shortage in 2018

    Nicholas Dufault, UF/IFAS Crop Pathologist, and Patrick Troy, UF/IFAS Row Crop Regional Agent

    As the 2018 peanut production season approaches, it is time for producers to start considering their fungicide programs. Chlorothalonil has been a staple fungicide in many peanut management programs, but shortages of this product are expected in 2018 as …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/02/16/fungicide-options-for-peanut-producers-due-to-the-expected-chlorothalonil-shortage-in-2018/

    Mandatory Dicamba Resistant Crop Training – March 16

    Friday March 16, 2018 10:00 AM -12:00 PM Eastern, 9:00-11:00 Central Live Video Conference to be hosted simultaneously by UF/IFAS Extension Offices across North Florida

    Purpose of the Training

    In 2017, dicamba resistant crops were registered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to receive dicamba herbicide applications over-the-top of growing cotton or soybean …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/02/09/mandatory-dicamba-resistant-crop-training-march-16/

    Insecticide Applications Can Inadvertently Cause Citrus Mite Outbreaks

    Xavier Martini, Pete Andersen, UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center

    In May 2017, Asian citrus psyllids (Diaphorina citri) were found in the experimental citrus grove at the Suwannee Valley Extension Center in Live Oak.  The trees were quickly treated with an insecticide containing the active ingredient, cyantraniliprole. This treatment was highly justified as …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2018/01/05/insecticide-applications-can-inadvertently-cause-citrus-mite-outbreaks/

    Input Requested for a UF Study on Farm Waste Management

    The challenges of waste disposal is an area of growing concern in the US, particularly among farmers.  The University of Florida is conducting survey research to explore how Florida farmers handle their waste and garbage.  The statewide survey will track chemical packaging and organic waste management across a number of different kinds of agricultural practices.  …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/12/15/input-requested-for-a-uf-study-on-farm-waste-management/

    Protecting Fall Vegetable Crops after the Hurricane

    As if the fall season wasn’t challenging enough from a pest and disease perspective, throw in a hurricane and it gets much worse. Luckily, the storm missed most of the Panhandle. Tomato and cucurbit producing areas in Gadsden and Jackson counties likely saw the greatest impacts from Hurricane Irma. The biggest problem was the wind …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/09/15/protecting-fall-vegetable-crops-after-the-hurricane/

    Weed of the Week: Coffee Senna

    Coffee Senna is not only an issue for livestock producers, as seeds are toxic when consumed, it also causes issues for cotton and peanut farmers in the southern states. The scientific name Senna occidentalis comes from Arabic and Latin roots, with Senna meaning “these plants” and occidentalis meaning “western,” in reference to its origin. While closely …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/09/15/weed-of-the-weed-coffee-senna/

    Weed of the Week: Southern Sandbur

    Across the Southern United States, Southern Sandbur (aka sandspur) can be found. It is an annual grass that grows in cropland and pastures, thriving in dry sandy soils. Southern Sandbur has a shallow fibrous root system and can easily invade poorly managed fields or pastures. It is known to impact the quality of hay fields, as …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/phag/2017/08/11/weed-of-the-week-southern-sandbur/

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