In this Issue:
  • Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings
  • NISAW 2016 – Air Potato Leaf Beetle, a Biological Control for Air Potato
  • NISAW 2016 – Climbing Ferns
  • Florida’s Rangeland Agriculture and the Environment: A Natural Partnership
  • Invasive Species of the Day: Cogongrass and Tawny Crazy Ant
  • Invasive Species of the Day: Tiger Prawn and Climbing Ferns
  • Invasive Species of the Day (February 24): Lionfish and Air Potato
  • National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) – February 22-28, 2015
  • The Majestic Longleaf: One of the South’s Distinguished Trees
  • Invasive Species of the Day (March 6th): Climbing Ferns & Chinese Privet
  • Timber

    Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings

    Controlling competing vegetation and brown spot disease are two main reasons we prescribe burn young longleaf plantations: Longleaf pine seedlings do not like competing vegetation and will stay in the grass stage for years if vegetation is not controlled by fire, mowing or herbicides. Using improved containerized seedlings along with good vegetation management can release …

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    NISAW 2016 – Air Potato Leaf Beetle, a Biological Control for Air Potato

    Air potato (Dioscores bulbifera) is a perennial, herbaceous self-twining vine that can grow over 60 feet in length, enabling it to climb over and smother many native plants. The Florida Exotic Plant Pest Council (FLEPPC) lists air potato as a Category 1 invasive plant, which means that it has disrupted natural communities and ecological functions …

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    NISAW 2016 – Climbing Ferns

      Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Old World Climbing Fern (Lygodium microphyllum) are presently the only non-native invasive ferns in Florida. Both ferns reproduce and spread readily by wind-blown spores. Animals, equipment, and even people that move through an area with climbing ferns are very likely to pick up spores and move them to other locations …

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    Florida’s Rangeland Agriculture and the Environment: A Natural Partnership

    Most of us living in panhandle Florida recognize that our farmers and ranchers are committed to sustainable production of food, fiber, and fuel for generations to come, but how will farmers continue to be productive while sharing natural resources with an ever growing population and an intricate environment? How will Florida’s agricultural lands, rangelands, and …

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    Invasive Species of the Day: Cogongrass and Tawny Crazy Ant

    Cogongrass (Imperata Cylindrica): Cogongrass is one of the 10 worst weeds in the world.  This grass is an aggressive grower and forms colonies causing loss of productive forest areas, severe degradation of habitat, and economic issues.  Since its introduction in the 1900s, Cogongrass has spread to most of the counties in Florida.  Reproduction occurs through …

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    Invasive Species of the Day: Tiger Prawn and Climbing Ferns

    Giant Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon): Giant Tiger Prawn: This large shrimp, also known as the Asian Tiger Shrimp and the Black Tiger Shrimp, can reach lengths between 8-12 inches.  It resembles are native edible penaeid shrimp but differs in that it has distinct black and yellow stripes. It was brought to the U.S. from the Indo-Pacific …

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    Invasive Species of the Day (February 24): Lionfish and Air Potato

    Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   Red Lionfish are a predatory reef fish that are non-native invasive species and have spread throughout Florida Waters.  They are members of the family Scorpaenidae whose members are venomous and the lionfish is no exception.  This fish is relatively small ranging from 10-12 inches in length and have a zebra-like appearance with …

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    National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) – February 22-28, 2015

    Many plants and animals have been introduced to new regions for centuries, as people have discovered new lands.  These transient species are known as non-natives, and can become invasive. Invasive species occur throughout the world and may blend in, be nondescript or highly attractive; they can be plant or animal; terrestrial or aquatic; they may …

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    The Majestic Longleaf: One of the South’s Distinguished Trees

    Steeped in history, the majestic longleaf (Pinus palustris) is an economically and ecologically important tree species of the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains. Its species name “palustris” means “of the marsh,” and although it is commonly associated with sandy, well drained areas, the longleaf pine is adapted to a range of soil types. Once the …

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    Invasive Species of the Day (March 6th): Climbing Ferns & Chinese Privet

    March 6th: Climbing Ferns (Lygodium sp.) & Chinese Privet (Ligustrum sinense) Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Old World Climbing Ferns (Lygodium microphyllum): are presently the only non-native invasive ferns in Florida.  Both ferns reproduce and spread readily by wind-blown spores. A single fertile leaflet can produce 28,600 spores.  Animals, equipment, and even people that …

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