Carrie Stevenson

Author's details

Name: Carrie Stevenson
Date registered: October 13, 2011

Biography

Coastal Sustainability Agent, Escambia County Extension

Latest posts

  1. Love Blueberries? Thank the Blueberry Bee! — May 1, 2017
  2. Landscaping for Children — April 7, 2017
  3. Observing Springtime Cycles in a Warming World — February 23, 2017
  4. Arbor Day: An American-born Celebration — January 17, 2017
  5. American Beech–an American Beauty — November 22, 2016

Author's posts listings

Love Blueberries? Thank the Blueberry Bee!

This time of year, blueberry bushes are flowering and small fruit are coming onto the wild and cultivated bushes in north Florida. Many of us, myself included, look forward to the late-spring harvest of blueberries, taking our children out to u-pick operations and digging out family recipes for blueberry-filled desserts. What many do not know, however, …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/05/01/love-blueberries-thank-the-blueberry-bee/

Landscaping for Children

I recently had the pleasure of visiting Bok Tower Gardens in Lake Wales, Florida and experienced one of their newest additions, a children’s garden. As much a playground as a place for growing plants, it was full of whimsical energy and invitations to explore. The entire area encouraged children to reach beyond their comfort zones and engage …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/04/07/landscaping-for-children/

Observing Springtime Cycles in a Warming World

It’s mid-February, and regardless of the groundhog’s prediction, spring seems to have arrived in northwest Florida. In my neighborhood, all the azaleas have bloomed. While beautiful, it’s something that usually doesn’t happen around here until well into March! According to NOAA and NASA climate data, 2016 was the hottest year globally on record, followed by …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/02/23/observing-springtime-cycles-in-a-warming-world/

Arbor Day: An American-born Celebration

Arbor Day has a 145-year history, started in Nebraska by a nature-loving newspaper editor named J. Sterling Morton who recognized the many valuable services trees provide. The first Arbor Day was such a big success that Mr. Morton’s idea quickly spread nationwide–particularly with children planting trees on school grounds and caring for them throughout the …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/01/17/arbor-day-an-american-born-celebration/

American Beech–an American Beauty

During a recent hike through wooded property in Walton County, our Florida Master Naturalist class came across a stunning example of an American Beech tree (Fagus grandifolia). As we looked closely at its thick, sinewy trunk (often compared to an elephant’s skin), the bark changed hues from a deep red to silvery gray and brown. …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/11/22/american-beech-an-american-beauty/

Saltbush–a Native Beauty, of Sorts

In the spring and summer, no one notices the little green shrub hidden among wax myrtle and marsh elder at the edge of the salt marsh. However, if I’m leading a group of students or a Master Naturalist class through the same area in the fall, it’s the first plant people ask about. The saltbush …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/09/16/saltbush-a-native-beauty-of-sorts/

The Fig

Summer is full of simple pleasures—afternoon rainstorms, living in flip flops, and cooling off in a backyard pool. Among these, one of my favorites is walking out my door and picking handfuls of figs right from the tree. Before we planted our tree, my only prior experience with the fruit was a Fig Newton—I’d never …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/07/26/the-fig/

Don’t be a Sap! Knowing the difference between Florida pines

Pine trees are so common in the southeastern United States that they are often taken for granted. They are usually the first to be cut down when homeowners are nervous about storms, and unless you’re in the tree-growing business, they are not considered all that valuable. However, the history and development of northwest Florida is …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/06/01/dont-be-a-sap-knowing-the-difference-between-florida-pines/

Northwest Florida–Where the Plants Eat Meat!

Among the most fascinating natural phenomena in our area are the presence of dozens of species of carnivorous, or meat-eating, plants. Found in bogs, meadows, and seepage slopes with mucky, acidic soils and low levels of nutrients, these plants have adapted to their difficult conditions by developing ways to digest insects.These carnivores are best known …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/03/29/northwest-florida-where-the-plants-eat-meat/

Planning Ahead May Reduce Home and Landscape Damage

When we think of bad weather in Florida, hurricanes are typically the first thing that comes to mind. In reality, Florida is 4th in the nation in tornado frequency—and when adjusted for frequency per square mile, we are actually number 1. Residents of Escambia County are believers now, as the community reels from enduring two …

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Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/03/02/planning-ahead-can-reduce-home-and-landscape-damage/

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