In this Issue:
  • The Wacissa River: Clear and Wild
  • Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife
  • Researchers Test Traps for Controlling Deepwater Invasive Lionfish
  • Let’s Cool Off
  • Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time
  • An Intimidating Fish They Call the Stingray
  • Camp Timpoochee: Marine Camps 2018
  • Septic systems: What should you do when a flood occurs?
  • Panhandle Ecotourism: Blackwater River State Park
  • “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya
  • Florida Panhandle

    The Wacissa River: Clear and Wild

    Being off the beaten path has many advantages. In the case of a spring-fed river, it translates to less pressure from human use and a great opportunity for those who do visit to experience the “real Florida”. The Wacissa River, located in the southern half of Jefferson County, Florida, is near the crossroads identified as …

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    Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife

    It’s that time of year when landowners, hunters, and other wildlife enthusiasts begin to plan and prepare fall and winter food plots to attract wildlife like the nice buck in the photo. Annual food plots are expensive and labor intensive to plant every year and with that thought in mind, an option you may want …

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    Researchers Test Traps for Controlling Deepwater Invasive Lionfish

    Written By: Laura Tiu, Holden Harris, and Alexander Fogg It’s early morning as Dreadknot Charters speeds out of Destin Harbor towards the offshore reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers Holden Harris (Graduate Research Fellow, University of Florida), Alex Fogg, (Marine Resource Coordinator, Okaloosa County), and the Dreadknot crew, Josh and Joe Livingston, ready their …

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    Let’s Cool Off

    With more than 250 crystal clear springs in Northwest Florida it is just a short road trip to a pristine swimming hole! Springs and their associated flowing water bodies provide important habitat for wildlife and plants. Just as importantly, springs provide people with recreational activities and the opportunity to connect with the natural environment. While …

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    Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time

    Florida’s rivers, springs, wetlands, and estuaries are central features to the identity of northwest Florida. They provide a wide range of services that benefit peoples’ health and well-being in our region. They create recreational opportunities for swimmers, canoers, and kayakers; support diverse wildlife for birders and plant enthusiasts; sustain a vibrant commercial and recreational fishery …

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    An Intimidating Fish They Call the Stingray

    It is now late May and in recent weeks I, and several volunteers, have been surveying the area for terrapins, horseshoe crabs, and monitoring local seagrass beds. We see many creatures when we are out and about; one that has been quite common all over the bay has been the “stingray”. These are intimidating creatures… …

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    Camp Timpoochee: Marine Camps 2018

    Are you interested in learning about marine life, going fishing, or exploring the underwater world with a mask and snorkel? If so, this is the camp for you! This local education opportunity for budding marine scientists will be happening this summer at Camp Timpoochee in Niceville, FL.   The camps enable participants to explore the marine …

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    Septic systems: What should you do when a flood occurs?

    Approximately 30% of Florida’s population relies on septic systems, or onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems (OSTDS), to treat and dispose of household wastewater. This includes all water from bathrooms and kitchens, and laundry machines. When properly maintained, septic systems can last 25-30 years, and maintenance costs are relatively low. In a nutshell, the most …

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    Panhandle Ecotourism: Blackwater River State Park

    Spring has sprung and it is time to get outside and explore this great Florida Panhandle area.  In neighboring Santa Rosa County, a terrific destination for a variety of outdoor activities is Blackwater River State Park.  Visitors can canoe, kayak, tube, fish and swim the river.  Hikers can enjoy trails through nearly 600 acres of …

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    “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya

    Having just completed the Okaloosa/Walton Uplands Master Naturalist course, I would like to share information from the project that was presented by Ann Foley.   The Florida Torreya is the most endangered tree in North America, and perhaps the world! Less than 1% of the historical population survives. Unless something is done soon, it may …

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