In this Issue:
  • NISAW 2017: Bamboo
  • NISAW 2017: Cuban Treefrog—Invasive Invader in Florida
  • NISAW 2017: Trying to Stay Ahead of Beach Vitex
  • NISAW 2017: Laurel Wilt
  • NISAW 2017: Fungal Pathogen Invaders
  • NISAW 2017: Cuban Anole
  • NISAW 2017: It is Common and Abundant, but Torpedo Grass is Still a Problem
  • NISAW 2017: Micro-Invasives can Cause Big Problems – Bacterial Pathogens
  • NISAW 2017: National Invasive Species Awareness Week
  • NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida
  • Invasives

    NISAW 2017: Bamboo

    Standing in the midst of a stand of bamboo, it’s easy to feel dwarfed. Smooth and sturdy, the hollow, sectioned woody shoots of this fascinating plant can tower as tall as 70 feet. Unfortunately, bamboo is a real threat to natural ecosystems, moving quickly through wooded areas, wetlands, and neighborhoods, taking out native species as …

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    NISAW 2017: Cuban Treefrog—Invasive Invader in Florida

    Guest Blogger – Dr. Steve A. Johnson, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida The National Invasive Species Council defines an invasive species as one that is introduced outside its native range where it causes harm (or is likely to) to the environment, economy, or human quality of …

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    NISAW 2017: Trying to Stay Ahead of Beach Vitex

    Research shows that the most effective time to deal with an invasive species, both in terms of controlling or eradicating the species and money spent to do so, is early on…. What we call Early Detection Rapid Response. Beach vitex is a good candidate for this. The first record for vitex in the Florida panhandle …

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    NISAW 2017: Laurel Wilt

    Many invasive plants and insects are introduced in packing materials, including 12 species of ambrosia beetles, which embed themselves in wood used as crates and pallets. While these tiny beetles don’t actually feed on wood, the adults and larvae feed on fungi that is inoculated into galleries within the sapwood by the females when they …

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    NISAW 2017: Fungal Pathogen Invaders

    Special Guest Blogger – Lorraine Ketzler, Biological Science Technician with US Fish and Wildlife Service There have been several fungal invaders entering and spreading within the US in recent years and I’d like to draw attention to four of them: White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) Chytridiomycosis (Chytrids) in frogs (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) Chytridiomycosis (B-sal) …

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    NISAW 2017: Cuban Anole

    The brown anole, a lizard native to Cuba and the Bahamas, first appeared in the Florida Keys in 1887. Since then it has moved northward becoming established in nearly every county in Florida. By hitching a ride on boats and cars, as well as, hanging out in landscape plants being shipped throughout the state, the …

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    NISAW 2017: It is Common and Abundant, but Torpedo Grass is Still a Problem

    They say the best time to attack an invasive species is early in its arrival. In the early stages is your best chance, using the most cost effective methods, of eradicating an invasive species from a region.  Hence our focus on Early Detection Rapid Response (EDRR) list.  That is not the case with Torpedo Grass.  …

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    NISAW 2017: Micro-Invasives can Cause Big Problems – Bacterial Pathogens

    If we look at the big picture when it comes to invasive species, some of the smallest organisms on the planet should pop right into focus. A microscopic bacterium named Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, the cause of Citrus Greening (HLB), has devastated the citrus industry worldwide. This tiny creature lives and multiplies within the phloem tissue …

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    NISAW 2017: National Invasive Species Awareness Week

    Aliens are invading our forests, pastures, fields and lawns. Well, okay, not aliens but invasive species are invading our beautiful landscapes.  Invasive species are non-native or exotic species that do not naturally occur in an area, cause economic or environmental harm, or negatively impact human health.  These invasive species have become the number one threat to biodiversity …

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    NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida

        Matthew Phillips and Scott Jackson – UF/IFAS Extension and Research works with many partners supporting invasive species management actions and strategies across Florida. One key partner is the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conserva­tion Commission (FWC), Invasive Plant Management Section. FWC Biologists provide resources and expertise to address threats from Florida’s most disruptive invasive …

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