In this Issue:
  • Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife
  • Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time
  • Septic systems: What should you do when a flood occurs?
  • The Beautiful, but Invasive, Mimosa
  • Florida Cover Crops Hold Common Ground
  • Native Plants and Wildlife
  • Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings
  • NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida
  • NISAW 2016 – Air Potato Leaf Beetle, a Biological Control for Air Potato
  • NISAW 2016 – Tropical Soda Apple
  • Land Management

    Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife

    It’s that time of year when landowners, hunters, and other wildlife enthusiasts begin to plan and prepare fall and winter food plots to attract wildlife like the nice buck in the photo. Annual food plots are expensive and labor intensive to plant every year and with that thought in mind, an option you may want …

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    Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time

    Florida’s rivers, springs, wetlands, and estuaries are central features to the identity of northwest Florida. They provide a wide range of services that benefit peoples’ health and well-being in our region. They create recreational opportunities for swimmers, canoers, and kayakers; support diverse wildlife for birders and plant enthusiasts; sustain a vibrant commercial and recreational fishery …

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    Septic systems: What should you do when a flood occurs?

    Approximately 30% of Florida’s population relies on septic systems, or onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems (OSTDS), to treat and dispose of household wastewater. This includes all water from bathrooms and kitchens, and laundry machines. When properly maintained, septic systems can last 25-30 years, and maintenance costs are relatively low. In a nutshell, the most …

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    The Beautiful, but Invasive, Mimosa

    It is easy to notice the display of bright pink puffs erupting on low-growing trees along roadsides. This attractive plant is the Mimosa tree, Albizia julibrissin. These once popular small trees are commonly found in the yards of older homes in Florida where the display of prolific blooms starts up as the weather warms. This …

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    Florida Cover Crops Hold Common Ground

    One of the great barriers to progress in most policy discussions is an “Us” vs. “Them” battle based on historic generalizations and unawareness of change and current practices of the two “sides”. The bad news is there has been much such conflict between “farmers” and “environmentalists”, but there is good news out there. As contentious …

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    Native Plants and Wildlife

    According to the Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants, there are more than 4,200 plant species naturally occurring in the state.  Nearly 3,000 are considered native.  The Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS) defines native plants as “those species occurring within the state boundaries prior to European contact, according to the best available scientific and historical documentation.”  …

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    Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings

    Controlling competing vegetation and brown spot disease are two main reasons we prescribe burn young longleaf plantations: Longleaf pine seedlings do not like competing vegetation and will stay in the grass stage for years if vegetation is not controlled by fire, mowing or herbicides. Using improved containerized seedlings along with good vegetation management can release …

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    NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida

        Matthew Phillips and Scott Jackson – UF/IFAS Extension and Research works with many partners supporting invasive species management actions and strategies across Florida. One key partner is the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conserva­tion Commission (FWC), Invasive Plant Management Section. FWC Biologists provide resources and expertise to address threats from Florida’s most disruptive invasive …

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    NISAW 2016 – Air Potato Leaf Beetle, a Biological Control for Air Potato

    Air potato (Dioscores bulbifera) is a perennial, herbaceous self-twining vine that can grow over 60 feet in length, enabling it to climb over and smother many native plants. The Florida Exotic Plant Pest Council (FLEPPC) lists air potato as a Category 1 invasive plant, which means that it has disrupted natural communities and ecological functions …

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    NISAW 2016 – Tropical Soda Apple

    Florida ranchers know Tropical Soda Apple (TSA) as the “Plant from Hell”. It was first noticed in south Florida, but its seeds survive in the digestive tract of animals and it spread north through the movement of hay and cattle. TSA plants are covered with thorns and can make large sections of pasture nearly useless …

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