In this Issue:
  • Florida Cover Crops Hold Common Ground
  • Native Plants and Wildlife
  • Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings
  • NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida
  • NISAW 2016 – Air Potato Leaf Beetle, a Biological Control for Air Potato
  • NISAW 2016 – Tropical Soda Apple
  • NISAW 2016 – Climbing Ferns
  • NISAW 2016 – Chinese Tallow Tree
  • NISAW 2016 – Coral Ardisia, A Pretty Problem
  • The Mystery on Seahorse Key
  • Land Management

    Florida Cover Crops Hold Common Ground

    One of the great barriers to progress in most policy discussions is an “Us” vs. “Them” battle based on historic generalizations and unawareness of change and current practices of the two “sides”. The bad news is there has been much such conflict between “farmers” and “environmentalists”, but there is good news out there. As contentious …

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    Native Plants and Wildlife

    According to the Atlas of Florida Vascular Plants, there are more than 4,200 plant species naturally occurring in the state.  Nearly 3,000 are considered native.  The Florida Native Plant Society (FNPS) defines native plants as “those species occurring within the state boundaries prior to European contact, according to the best available scientific and historical documentation.”  …

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    Control Burning Newly Planted Longleaf Pines and Saplings

    Controlling competing vegetation and brown spot disease are two main reasons we prescribe burn young longleaf plantations: Longleaf pine seedlings do not like competing vegetation and will stay in the grass stage for years if vegetation is not controlled by fire, mowing or herbicides. Using improved containerized seedlings along with good vegetation management can release …

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    NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida

        Matthew Phillips and Scott Jackson – UF/IFAS Extension and Research works with many partners supporting invasive species management actions and strategies across Florida. One key partner is the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conserva­tion Commission (FWC), Invasive Plant Management Section. FWC Biologists provide resources and expertise to address threats from Florida’s most disruptive invasive …

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    NISAW 2016 – Air Potato Leaf Beetle, a Biological Control for Air Potato

    Air potato (Dioscores bulbifera) is a perennial, herbaceous self-twining vine that can grow over 60 feet in length, enabling it to climb over and smother many native plants. The Florida Exotic Plant Pest Council (FLEPPC) lists air potato as a Category 1 invasive plant, which means that it has disrupted natural communities and ecological functions …

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    NISAW 2016 – Tropical Soda Apple

    Florida ranchers know Tropical Soda Apple (TSA) as the “Plant from Hell”. It was first noticed in south Florida, but its seeds survive in the digestive tract of animals and it spread north through the movement of hay and cattle. TSA plants are covered with thorns and can make large sections of pasture nearly useless …

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    NISAW 2016 – Climbing Ferns

      Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Old World Climbing Fern (Lygodium microphyllum) are presently the only non-native invasive ferns in Florida. Both ferns reproduce and spread readily by wind-blown spores. Animals, equipment, and even people that move through an area with climbing ferns are very likely to pick up spores and move them to other locations …

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    NISAW 2016 – Chinese Tallow Tree

    Benjamin Franklin has been blamed for introducing the invasive Chinese Tallow tree to the Southeast when he mailed seeds to a planter after one of his trips to London in the late 1700’s. However, recent DNA work has traced the invasive strain to federal scientists’ importations in 1905. No matter. The “Popcorn Tree,” as it’s …

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    NISAW 2016 – Coral Ardisia, A Pretty Problem

    Coral Ardisia (Ardisia crenata) Coral ardisia is also known as coral berry, spice berry, and scratchthroat. It was introduced into Florida in the early 1900’s for ornamental purposes.   In the ensuing years it has since escaped cultivation and become established in hardwood hammocks and other moist woods of natural areas and grazing lands. Specimens …

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    The Mystery on Seahorse Key

    First let me explain that Seahorse Key is not in the Florida Panhandle but the story is interesting and a similar phenomena could occur here. Seahorse Key is an isolated island 3.6 miles southwest of Cedar Key in Florida’s Big Bend. There is a science lab owned and maintained by the University of Florida and …

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