In this Issue:
  • “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya
  • A Ghost in the Woods
  • Arbor Day–a celebration of the trees in our lives
  • Deck the Halls With Boughs of Holly
  • The Marshes, they are a-changin’
  • The Bumble Bee – One of Florida’s Vital Pollinators
  • Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions
  • Lemon bacopa, a beautiful pond plant or a weed?
  • A Florida Native; Tape Grass
  • Native plants

    “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya

    Having just completed the Okaloosa/Walton Uplands Master Naturalist course, I would like to share information from the project that was presented by Ann Foley.   The Florida Torreya is the most endangered tree in North America, and perhaps the world! Less than 1% of the historical population survives. Unless something is done soon, it may …

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    A Ghost in the Woods

    Imagine you are enjoying perfect fall weather on a hike with your family, when suddenly you come upon a ghost. Translucent white, small and creeping out of the ground behind a tree, you stop and look closer to figure out what it is you’ve just seen. In such an environment, the “ghost” you might come …

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    Arbor Day–a celebration of the trees in our lives

    Do you have a favorite tree? Often, the trees in our lives tell a story. One of the selling points when we bought our house 14 years ago was the tall, healthy Southern magnolia in the front yard. It was beautiful, and I could see it out my front window. A perfect shade tree, I …

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    Deck the Halls With Boughs of Holly

    According to Druid lore, hanging the plant in homes would bring good luck and protection. Holly was considered sacred because it remained green and strong with brightly colored red berries no matter how harsh the winter.  Most other plants would wilt and die. Later, Christians adopted the holly tradition from Druid practices and developed symbolism …

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    The Marshes, they are a-changin’

    Discovering something new is possibly the most exciting thing a field biologist can do. As students, budding biologists imagine coming across something no one else has ever noticed before, maybe even getting the opportunity to name a new bird, fish, or plant after themselves. Well, here in Pensacola, we are discovering something that, while already …

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    The Bumble Bee – One of Florida’s Vital Pollinators

    “The happiness of the bee and the dolphin is to exist. For man it is to know that and to wonder at it.” Jacques Yves Cousteau Bumble bees are among the most recognizable types of insects. They are large, colorful, and a wonder to watch.  They’re also popularized in media, cartoons, and clip-art images, but …

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    Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions

    Life on the coast has tremendous benefits; steady sea breezes, gorgeous beaches, plentiful fishing and paddling opportunities. Nevertheless, there are definite downsides to living along it, too. Besides storms like Hurricane Harvey making semi-regular appearances, our proximity to the water can make us more vulnerable to flooding and waterborne hazards ranging from bacteria to jellyfish. …

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    Lemon bacopa, a beautiful pond plant or a weed?

    Bacopa caroliniana, also known as lemon bacopa, is a popular aquatic plant. It is mostly found in the southeastern United States in states such as Florida, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Mississippi and even Texas. Lemon bacopa has a perennial life cycle that could make it a weed to some, or desired plant to others. Also, …

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    A Florida Native; Tape Grass

    Article by Gadsden County Extension Agent DJ Zadarreyal   Vallisneria americana, also known as tape grass or eel grass, is a common native aquatic weed in the state of Florida. Tape grass has tall, grass-like leaves that are a light green in coloration and rise vertically from the crown to the top of the water. …

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