In this Issue:
  • The Bumble Bee – One of Florida’s Vital Pollinators
  • Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions
  • Lemon bacopa, a beautiful pond plant or a weed?
  • A Florida Native; Tape Grass
  • Native plants

    The Bumble Bee – One of Florida’s Vital Pollinators

    “The happiness of the bee and the dolphin is to exist. For man it is to know that and to wonder at it.” Jacques Yves Cousteau Bumble bees are among the most recognizable types of insects. They are large, colorful, and a wonder to watch.  They’re also popularized in media, cartoons, and clip-art images, but …

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    Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions

    Life on the coast has tremendous benefits; steady sea breezes, gorgeous beaches, plentiful fishing and paddling opportunities. Nevertheless, there are definite downsides to living along it, too. Besides storms like Hurricane Harvey making semi-regular appearances, our proximity to the water can make us more vulnerable to flooding and waterborne hazards ranging from bacteria to jellyfish. …

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    Lemon bacopa, a beautiful pond plant or a weed?

    Bacopa caroliniana, also known as lemon bacopa, is a popular aquatic plant. It is mostly found in the southeastern United States in states such as Florida, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Mississippi and even Texas. Lemon bacopa has a perennial life cycle that could make it a weed to some, or desired plant to others. Also, …

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    A Florida Native; Tape Grass

    Article by Gadsden County Extension Agent DJ Zadarreyal   Vallisneria americana, also known as tape grass or eel grass, is a common native aquatic weed in the state of Florida. Tape grass has tall, grass-like leaves that are a light green in coloration and rise vertically from the crown to the top of the water. …

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