In this Issue:
  • Grass Carp – A Biological Control “Tool” to Manage Invasive Aquatic Plants
  • Lemon bacopa, a beautiful pond plant or a weed?
  • A Florida Native; Tape Grass
  • Miniature Plants with Sizeable Character
  • Your Christmas Tree Could Benefit Winter Wildlife
  • Florida’s Aquatic Carnivorous Plants – Yes, Aquatic!
  • Pond Management Workshops May 31 and June 7
  • Discover the Beauty and Role of Native Aquatic Plants – in Your Own Pond
  • Do Your Part to Stop the Spread
  • NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida
  • Pond Management

    Grass Carp – A Biological Control “Tool” to Manage Invasive Aquatic Plants

    Spring is only days away.  Everywhere you look, plants of all kinds are awakening to recent rains, longer days, and fertile soils; and this includes aquatic plants as well!  Florida has hundreds of aquatic plant species, and they are an often-overlooked feature of Florida’s landscape.  Overlooked that is, until the growth of non-native (or even …

    Continue reading »

    Lemon bacopa, a beautiful pond plant or a weed?

    Bacopa caroliniana, also known as lemon bacopa, is a popular aquatic plant. It is mostly found in the southeastern United States in states such as Florida, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Mississippi and even Texas. Lemon bacopa has a perennial life cycle that could make it a weed to some, or desired plant to others. Also, …

    Continue reading »

    A Florida Native; Tape Grass

    Article by Gadsden County Extension Agent DJ Zadarreyal   Vallisneria americana, also known as tape grass or eel grass, is a common native aquatic weed in the state of Florida. Tape grass has tall, grass-like leaves that are a light green in coloration and rise vertically from the crown to the top of the water. …

    Continue reading »

    Miniature Plants with Sizeable Character

    Some of the world’s smallest flowering plants grow in aquatic environments.  And a number of these tiny aquatic plants grow natively right here in Florida!  Aquatic plants of all kinds display an amazing array of adaptations for growing in water.  They can tolerate drought, flood, flowing water, stagnant water, cold spring runs, and warm brackish …

    Continue reading »

    Your Christmas Tree Could Benefit Winter Wildlife

    Americans purchased approximately 30 million live Christmas trees last year. If you plan to have a live tree this winter, and you’re wondering what you could do with your tree once it has finished its role as holiday decoration in your home, read below. Rather than simply dragging your tree to the curb for the …

    Continue reading »

    Florida’s Aquatic Carnivorous Plants – Yes, Aquatic!

    I don’t know about you, but living in “La Florida” – “the land of flowers” (the Spanish translation of Florida – named in 1513 by Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León) makes it difficult to have a short list of favorite plants.  While I do have a number of plants in my “favorites” list, carnivorous …

    Continue reading »

    Pond Management Workshops May 31 and June 7

    Ponds can be a source of great enjoyment. However, properly managing them to meet your desired goals can be challenging. Panhandle Pond Management, a two part series being offered by UF/IFAS Extension, is designed to help pond owners/managers become more successful in reaching their goals. Specialists from campus will be onsite to share their expertise. …

    Continue reading »

    Discover the Beauty and Role of Native Aquatic Plants – in Your Own Pond

    This is the time of year when gardens burst forth with lush green growth and colorful flowers.  With a little planning and management, your backyard pond can also put on the same show each year and fight unwanted pond weeds at the same time! Fish and farm ponds are abundant in the Florida panhandle.  Most …

    Continue reading »

    Do Your Part to Stop the Spread

    With all the news about the Zika virus spread in Florida, now is the time to start thinking about mosquito protection. As the weather warms, they will be hatching.  Check out where the water is collecting in your yard.  The female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes lay their eggs in temporary flood water pools; even very small …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida

        Matthew Phillips and Scott Jackson – UF/IFAS Extension and Research works with many partners supporting invasive species management actions and strategies across Florida. One key partner is the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conserva­tion Commission (FWC), Invasive Plant Management Section. FWC Biologists provide resources and expertise to address threats from Florida’s most disruptive invasive …

    Continue reading »

    Older posts «