In this Issue:
  • Miniature Plants with Sizeable Character
  • Your Christmas Tree Could Benefit Winter Wildlife
  • Florida’s Aquatic Carnivorous Plants – Yes, Aquatic!
  • Pond Management Workshops May 31 and June 7
  • Discover the Beauty and Role of Native Aquatic Plants – in Your Own Pond
  • Do Your Part to Stop the Spread
  • NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida
  • NISAW 2016 – Controlling Weeds in Your Pond: Water Hyacinth
  • Does your pond need fertilization?
  • Springtime is “Just Right” for Using Aquatic Herbicides
  • Pond Management

    Miniature Plants with Sizeable Character

    Some of the world’s smallest flowering plants grow in aquatic environments.  And a number of these tiny aquatic plants grow natively right here in Florida!  Aquatic plants of all kinds display an amazing array of adaptations for growing in water.  They can tolerate drought, flood, flowing water, stagnant water, cold spring runs, and warm brackish …

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    Your Christmas Tree Could Benefit Winter Wildlife

    Americans purchased approximately 30 million live Christmas trees last year. If you plan to have a live tree this winter, and you’re wondering what you could do with your tree once it has finished its role as holiday decoration in your home, read below. Rather than simply dragging your tree to the curb for the …

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    Florida’s Aquatic Carnivorous Plants – Yes, Aquatic!

    I don’t know about you, but living in “La Florida” – “the land of flowers” (the Spanish translation of Florida – named in 1513 by Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León) makes it difficult to have a short list of favorite plants.  While I do have a number of plants in my “favorites” list, carnivorous …

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    Pond Management Workshops May 31 and June 7

    Ponds can be a source of great enjoyment. However, properly managing them to meet your desired goals can be challenging. Panhandle Pond Management, a two part series being offered by UF/IFAS Extension, is designed to help pond owners/managers become more successful in reaching their goals. Specialists from campus will be onsite to share their expertise. …

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    Discover the Beauty and Role of Native Aquatic Plants – in Your Own Pond

    This is the time of year when gardens burst forth with lush green growth and colorful flowers.  With a little planning and management, your backyard pond can also put on the same show each year and fight unwanted pond weeds at the same time! Fish and farm ponds are abundant in the Florida panhandle.  Most …

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    Do Your Part to Stop the Spread

    With all the news about the Zika virus spread in Florida, now is the time to start thinking about mosquito protection. As the weather warms, they will be hatching.  Check out where the water is collecting in your yard.  The female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes lay their eggs in temporary flood water pools; even very small …

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    NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida

        Matthew Phillips and Scott Jackson – UF/IFAS Extension and Research works with many partners supporting invasive species management actions and strategies across Florida. One key partner is the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conserva­tion Commission (FWC), Invasive Plant Management Section. FWC Biologists provide resources and expertise to address threats from Florida’s most disruptive invasive …

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    NISAW 2016 – Controlling Weeds in Your Pond: Water Hyacinth

    Libbie Johnson UF IFAS Escambia County Extension Northwest Florida can be a pond owner’s paradise. There is usually enough rainfall to keep ponds filled, catfish, bass, and brim are well adapted to the environmental conditions, and there is a long season to catch fish. One of the biggest problems pond owners face is the constant …

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    Does your pond need fertilization?

    These days many ponds are just backyard recreational ponds.  Management goals vary from owner to another.  Some pond owners want very little productivity (very little fish removed).  They want little vegetation with just a few fish.  This pond is just meant for relaxation and aesthetics.  Other pond owners want to fish every once in a …

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    Springtime is “Just Right” for Using Aquatic Herbicides

    Similar to Goldilocks’ porridge, water temperature doesn’t need to be too hot or too cold, it needs to be just right for using aquatic herbicides (70o – 80o F). Here in Florida, these optimum water temperatures occur in the spring. Water temperature largely regulates the growth of most aquatic weeds; cool temperatures slow or stop growth …

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