In this Issue:
  • With Hurricane Season Approaching, Are You Prepared for an Evacuation?
  • Am I Living in a Floodplain?
  • NISAW 2017: The Kudzu Bug
  • NISAW 2017: Cuban Treefrog—Invasive Invader in Florida
  • NISAW 2017: Trying to Stay Ahead of Beach Vitex
  • NISAW 2017: Laurel Wilt
  • NISAW 2017: Fungal Pathogen Invaders
  • NISAW 2017: National Invasive Species Awareness Week
  • Christmas”sea” Cheer!
  • Panhandle Saltmarshes: Riches Beyond our Dreams
  • Uncategorized

    With Hurricane Season Approaching, Are You Prepared for an Evacuation?

    Hurricane season begins this year on June 1st and ends November 30th. As Floridians, we face the possibility of hurricanes each year. This simply goes with the territory. During these months, it’s important to plan for the threat of a hurricane, and at the same time hope, it never happens. First and foremost, you may …

    Continue reading »

    Am I Living in a Floodplain?

    Floods are a common concern in many areas of the U.S. Gulf coastal residents should be particularly aware. Floods may come in the form of flash floods, which come with little warning. Other flood conditions come on slower, as with large thunder storm fronts and tropical storms. With hurricane season not far away, it’s a …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2017: The Kudzu Bug

    A few years ago, Florida is extended a warm welcome to a new pest – The Kudzu Bug! The kudzu bug was first documented in the US in 2009 in Northeast Georgia.  It has quickly spread throughout the southeast. At first, a pest that attacks kudzu sounds pretty good but this bug also attacks wisteria, …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2017: Cuban Treefrog—Invasive Invader in Florida

    Guest Blogger – Dr. Steve A. Johnson, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist, Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida The National Invasive Species Council defines an invasive species as one that is introduced outside its native range where it causes harm (or is likely to) to the environment, economy, or human quality of …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2017: Trying to Stay Ahead of Beach Vitex

    Research shows that the most effective time to deal with an invasive species, both in terms of controlling or eradicating the species and money spent to do so, is early on…. What we call Early Detection Rapid Response. Beach vitex is a good candidate for this. The first record for vitex in the Florida panhandle …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2017: Laurel Wilt

    Many invasive plants and insects are introduced in packing materials, including 12 species of ambrosia beetles, which embed themselves in wood used as crates and pallets. While these tiny beetles don’t actually feed on wood, the adults and larvae feed on fungi that is inoculated into galleries within the sapwood by the females when they …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2017: Fungal Pathogen Invaders

    Special Guest Blogger – Lorraine Ketzler, Biological Science Technician with US Fish and Wildlife Service There have been several fungal invaders entering and spreading within the US in recent years and I’d like to draw attention to four of them: White-nose Syndrome (WNS) in bats (Pseudogymnoascus destructans) Chytridiomycosis (Chytrids) in frogs (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) Chytridiomycosis (B-sal) …

    Continue reading »

    NISAW 2017: National Invasive Species Awareness Week

    Aliens are invading our forests, pastures, fields and lawns. Well, okay, not aliens but invasive species are invading our beautiful landscapes.  Invasive species are non-native or exotic species that do not naturally occur in an area, cause economic or environmental harm, or negatively impact human health.  These invasive species have become the number one threat to biodiversity …

    Continue reading »

    Christmas”sea” Cheer!

    The holiday season is a special time for most of us! There are many creatures that live under the sea that represent many of our holiday traditions. Photo Credit: Fl. Museum Of Natural  History, George Burgess Small cookie cutter sharks are found in very deep water during the day, at night they migrate up the water …

    Continue reading »

    Panhandle Saltmarshes: Riches Beyond our Dreams

    The Florida Panhandle is fortunate to have an abundance of salt marsh habitat fringing many of our coastal environs. Although this habitat may not receive the appreciation it deserves by those seeking a white-sandy beach, it is intricately linked with many of the natural treasures we are blessed with. Salt marshes occur in the ecotone …

    Continue reading »

    Older posts «