Wildlife Habitat Management – Springtime Reminders

Wildlife Habitat Management – Springtime Reminders

Spring can be a busy time of year for those of us who are interested in improving wildlife habitat on the property we own/manage. Spring is when we start many efforts that will pay-off in the fall. If you are a weekend warrior land manager like me there is always more to do than there are available Saturdays to get it done. The following comments are simple reminders about some habitat management activities that should be moving to the top of your to-do list this time of year.

Aquatic Weed Management – If you had problematic weeds in you pond last summer, chances are you will have them again this summer. NOW (spring) is the time to start controlling aquatic weeds. The later into the summer you wait the worse the weeds will get and the more difficult they will be to control. The risk of a fish-kill associated with aquatic weed control also increases as water temperatures and the total biomass of the weeds go up. Springtime is “Just Right” for Using Aquatic Herbicides

Cogongrass Control – Spring is actually the second-best time of year to treat cogongrass, fall (late September until first frost) is the BEST time. That said, ideally cogongrass will be treated with herbicide every six months, making spring and fall important. When treating spring regrowth make sure that there are green leaves at least one foot long before spraying. Spring is also an excellent time of year to identify cogongrass patches – the cottony, white blooms are easy to spot. Identify Cogongrass Now – Look for the Seedheads; Cogongrass – Now is the Best Time to Start Control

Cogongrass seedheads are easily spotted this time of year.
Photo credit: Mark Mauldin

 

Warm-Season Food Pots – There is a great deal of variation in when warm season food plots can be planted. Assuming warm-season plots will be panted in the same areas as cool-season plots, the simplest timing strategy is to simply wait for the cool-season plots to play out (a warm, dry May is normally the end of even the best cool-season plot) and then begin preparation for the warm-season plots. This transition period is the best time to deal with soil pH issues (get a soil test) and control weeds. Seed for many varieties of warm-season legumes (which should be the bulk of your plantings) can be somewhat hard to find, so start looking now. If you start early you can find what you want, and not just take whatever the feed store has. Warm Season Food Plots for White-tailed Deer

Deer Feeders – Per FWC regulations deer feeders need to be in continual operation for at least six months prior to hunting over them. Archery season in the Panhandle will start in mid-October, meaning deer feeders need to be up and running by mid-April to be legal to hunt opening morning. If you have plans to move or add feeders to your property, you’d better get to it pretty soon. FWC Feeding Game

 

Dove Fields – The first phase of dove season will begin in late September. When you look at the “days to maturity” for the various crops in the chart below you might feel like you’ve got plenty of time. While that may be true, don’t forget that not only do you need time for the crop to mature, but also for seeds to begin to drop and birds to find them all before the first phase begins. Because doves are particularly fond of feeding on clean ground, controlling weeds is a worthwhile endeavor. If you are planting on “new ground”, applying a non-selective herbicide several weeks before you begin tillage is an important first step to a clean field, but it adds more time to the process. As mentioned above, it’s always pertinent to start sourcing seed well in advance of your desired planting date. Timing is Crucial for Successful Dove Fields

 

There are many other projects that may be more time sensitive than the ones listed above. These were just a few that have snuck up on me over the years. The links in each section will provide more detailed information on the topics. If you have questions about anything addressed in the article feel free to contact me or your county’s UF/IFAS Extension Natural Resource Agent.

New App for FWC Deer Harvest Reporting System

New App for FWC Deer Harvest Reporting System

Archery season for white tailed deer opens this Saturday (10/24/20) in FWC Hunting Zone D (basically the Panhandle west of Tallahassee, see figure 1). Before you go hunting be sure that you have a plan in place for logging and reporting your harvest. Last year FWC implemented a mandatory harvest reporting system. That system is still in effect this year but with some modifications.

Figure 1. FWC Hunting Zone D
myfwc.com

The most notable change to the harvest reporting system this year is with the associated smart phone app. There is a new app this year – Fish|Hunt Florida. This new app will replace the Survey123 for ArcGIS app that was used last year.

In my opinion, the logging and reporting function on the Fish|Hunt Florida app is simpler to use than the previous app. Additionally the Fish|Hunt Florida app has many other useful features. A few highlights include; the ability to view and purchase hunting and fishing licenses/permits through the app, interactive versions of hunting and fishing regulations, and several other handy resources for sportsmen including, marine forecasts, tides, wildlife feeding times, sunrise & sunset times, boat ramp locator and a current location feature. Screenshots from the app are included below. The Fish|Hunt Florida app is available for free through the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store.

Remember, the current regulations state that your deer harvest must be logged before the animal is moved. Take a minute or two to install the app on your phone before you go hunting. Using the app allows logging and reporting to happen simultaneously. The app can be used for logging and reporting a harvest even in areas where cell service is poor. Harvest information will can be saved and the app will automatically complete the process as soon as adequate cell service is available. The alternative to using the app is a two-step process, the harvest can be logged (prior to being moved) on a paper form and then reported by calling 888-HUNT-FLORIDA (888-486-8356) or going to GoOutdoorsFlorida.com within 24 hours.

Follow the link for specific instructions for logging and reporting a harvested deer using the Fish|Hunt Florida app; don’t worry, it’s easy. Fish|Hunt Florida app instructions

For more information on the Fish|Hunt Florida app and the FWC Deer Harvest Reporting System visit  myfwc.com.

 

Screenshot of the Boat Info tab from the Hunt|Fish Florida App. Click on the image to make it larger.

Screenshot of the Fishing Tab from the Hunt|Fish Florida App. Click on the image to make it larger.

Screenshot of the Home screen from the Hunt|Fish Florida App. Click on the image to make it larger.

Screenshot of the Hunting tab from the Hunt|Fish Florida App. Click on the image to make it larger.

Wildlife Habitat Management – Springtime Reminders

What Are The Wildlife Up To This Summer?

As hunters and wildlife enthusiasts we tend to focus on wildlife behavior and biology during hunting season but tend to forget about them during the summer months.  But the summer months are very important to our population numbers.  Hunting season includes mating season, but now the babies are hitting the ground and the real fun is in full swing.

Whitetail deer are busy growing the new crop of fawns and growing antlers (for the bucks).  Bucks lose their antlers in the spring after rut and grow new ones this time of year.  For the most part, bucks grow bigger antlers each year until they peak around age 5-6.  Several factors enter into antler growth including age, genetics and nutrition.  You can’t change age or genetics easily but you can supply good nutrition as they are growing new antlers right now.  The added nutrition will also help the does that are fawning and nursing those fawns right now.

Wild turkey hens are busy raising their poults alone.  They breed and nest in the spring each year.  It only takes about 28 days of sitting on the nest for the eggs to hatch.  The poults are learning how to eat and groom themselves as well as how to roost and get away from predators.  Poults that have survived to this point have a good chance of making it to adulthood.  They will rejoin the larger population in the fall.

Warm season supplemental nutrition provides food sources when population numbers are at their highest.  Deer are nutritionally stressed due to antler growth and fawn rearing.  Turkey hens are finding places to feed their poults.  This supplemental nutrition can come in the form of grains provided in wildlife feeders or in food plots.  Food plots during the warm season are an underutilized nutrition source.  We can grow many highly nutritious forage crops for wildlife during the summer.  Some great choices include millet (brown top, pearl, dove proso), sunn hemp, clay peas, cowpeas, hairy indigo, perennial peanut, Aeschynomene Americana, alyceclover and more.

Warm Season Food Plots for White tailed deer publication

For more information about warm season wildlife food plots contact your local extension agent.

Wildlife Food Plots: Chufa for Wild Turkeys

Wildlife Food Plots: Chufa for Wild Turkeys

Wild Turkeys in Chufa planted in Gadsden County – Photo by Shep Eubanks UF IFAS

Wildlife management continues to be an area of growing interest on our local farms and ranches and has the potential to generate significant additional income to the farm enterprise.  It is also an opportunity to practice good stewardship of the natural resources that we have in abundance here in the Panhandle.  Each spring I get many phone calls from landowners wanting to know what they can plant to encourage wild turkeys to utilize their property more and to enhance the quality of their wild turkey habitat.  Chufa is one such plant that wild turkeys love like most of us love ice cream and it is easy to grow and will provide feed for turkeys for several months.

What is chufa?  Chufa is an African variety of the native nutsedge, which is a warm season perennial plant.  However, chufa is not as aggressive as the native nutsedges and typically will not create problems with succeeding crops that you might plant after it.  The actual foliage of the plant is not utilized by wildlife, but turkeys, hogs, ducks, and raccoons love the underground tubers that the plant produces.  Each individual plant can produce 10 to 75 peanut kernel sized tubers (see photo 1) that wildlife utilize.  These tubers are high in carbohydrates and protein, and they are also edible by humans, having a sweet taste similar to almonds or raw peanuts.

Photo 1. Chufa seed for planting – Photo by Shep Eubanks UF IFAS

Turkeys will usually begin to dig the chufas up in early fall as soon as the above ground leaves turn brown.  In Florida, they will dig and eat the nuts from fall throughout the winter and into spring. (see photo 2 of turkeys feeding in a spring chufa patch)

Photo 2. Turkeys scratching up chufas – Photo by Shep Eubanks UF IFAS

If you are considering planting chufa there are several considerations to take into account.  The chufa plant typically grows well anywhere that field corn can be grown.  You should soil test the area you intend to plant and lime to a pH between 6.0 – 6.5.  On most soils this requires 1 ton of lime per acre.  Recommended planting dates are April 1st through June 30th in the panhandle area.  Earlier plantings will provide higher yields, whereas later plantings typically will provide foraging for wildlife later into the following spring.  To maximize use by turkeys into the spring I would recommend looking at planting in June.  Chufa can be planted later than June 30th some years but remember that it takes the plant approximately 90 days to produce mature tubers and this must be accomplished prior to frost/cold weather.  Plant the seed into a well prepared and fertilized seedbed.  The seeding rate for chufa is 40 – 50 pounds per acre broadcast or 30 pounds per acre drilled on a 36 inch row spacing.  Strive for a coverage of 3 or 4 seed per square foot.  When broadcasting the seed, set your disk to cut about 4 inches deep.  This will cover the seed to an approximate depth of 2 inches which is ideal for chufa.  Normal fertilizer recommendations would be 200 pounds of 17-17-17 per acre or equivalent at planting.  When the plants are 6 – 12 inches high (approximately 1 month old) you should top dress with 100 pounds of actual N per acre (300 pounds of ammonium nitrate) to maximize yields.  With high costs of fertilizer this may not be as desirable, but yields will be smaller if fertilizer rates are reduced.  For weed control options on chufa plantings consult with your local County Extension Agent for up-to-date recommendations.

Small plantings are feasible (less than ¼ acre) if wild hogs are not present.  It has been my experience that best results are obtained with ½ acre or larger plantings.  Chufa is a plant that will do a good job of reseeding itself, sometimes for several years.  Reseeding can be accomplished by simply disking the area of the previous planting between April and the end of June and following fertilizer recommendations for the initial planting.  For most locations it is advisable to move the chufa plot to a different location after the second crop to avoid problems with soil pests. (see photo 3 of typical planting).

Photo 3. Chufa planting – Photo by Shep Eubanks UF IFAS

If you have never planted chufas before for your turkeys, you may want to pull some up or disk a row up in the fall after the tops have died back.  This will assist the turkeys in finding the plants if they have never encountered it before.  Once they do find it you can expect to find tremendous areas of scratching.  Quite often the plots will literally look like a mortar or bombing range where the turkeys dig down to get the chufas!

For more information consult with your local Extension Agent .

 

 

 

 

Enhancing Your Winter Wildlife Plots with Hard Mast Trees

Enhancing Your Winter Wildlife Plots with Hard Mast Trees

Five Year old Shumard Oak. Photo courtesy the author.

One of the keys to bagging a deer or mess of squirrels or just enjoying an afternoon viewing wildlife is to locate their preferred food source.  In the Panhandle, this often means finding a natural stand of oaks or other mast producing trees.  However, the concept of attracting animals to mast trees isn’t exclusive to natural areas; it can be replicated by hunters and wildlife enthusiasts to attract whitetail deer, squirrels, turkeys or any other game.  (Don’t let the terminology confuse you, “mast” is just a term meaning “fruit from a tree”.  “Hard” mast refers to nut producing trees -think Oak, Hickory, etc. Soft mast is just that, soft-fleshed fruits – think Pear, Plum, etc.  This piece will focus on hard mast trees.)   Regardless of semantics, the takeaway is that planting mast producing trees as winter wildlife attractants have several benefits.

  • Enhanced habitat. Planting diverse groups of hard mast producing trees provides wonderful cover for deer to browse, squirrels to nest, and turkeys to roost.  Also, groups of trees planted in open areas can help to create desired edge effects, see this publication on benefits of “edge” from Auburn University.
  • Excellent nutritional supplement to winter food-plot forages (winter food plots are defined here as open areas planted in the cool season with small forage grains like oats, clover, or ryegrass). If a diversity of species is planted, hard mast trees are an excellent, season-long (approximately October-January) source of proteins and fats.  They produce high-energy nutrients deer and other critters need to get through the winter months.

    5 year old Sawtooth Oak in December 2019, inter-planted in winter forage plot. Photo courtesy the author.

  • Reduction in time and money needing to be spent maintaining annual food plots. A well-designed grove of mast producing trees can be as effective in attracting deer and other animals as winter grazing plots and a whole lot cheaper.  A study done by the University of Tennessee Extension in 2008 found that hunters spent about $200 per acre on winter food plots (seed, fertilizer, equipment, time, etc.), an expense that will happen EVERY year. And as many of you know from personal experience, $200 is a VERY conservative number, particularly if you value your personal time at all.  Replacing half an acre of cultivated winter forage with mast trees will likely be more expensive in year one when you initially buy and plant but remember, if you do it right, you only have to do it once.

With those benefits of mast trees for wildlife attraction in mind, let’s address what and how to plant. Always select trees with desirable characteristics: long-lived, disease-free, and high-quality mast production at an early age (you don’t want your heirs to get all the benefit!).  In the Panhandle, Oaks (Quercus spp.) fit this bill best.  There are two groups of Oak to pick from, Red and White.  Red Oaks generally have dark, ridged bark, leaves with pointed lobes, small to medium-sized acorns that mature in two seasons, and tend to crop reliably each year.  White Oaks possess lighter colored bark, leaves with rounded lobes, large, “sweet” acorns maturing in one season, and tend to produce heavily in alternate years.  Plant some of each group to ensure an acorn crop each year and maximize wildlife benefit!  However, not just any old oak will do; the Oaks that most closely fit all the above characteristics are:

5 year old Nuttall Oak. Photo courtesy the author.

Nuttall Oak (Quercus nuttalli) – Red Oak Group.  Rapidly growing, attractive tree, very early producer of good-sized acorns (5-6 years).  Drops acorns late, providing needed fats and carbohydrates for bucks through much of the “rut” in the Panhandle (Late November-early February).  Tolerates flooding and bottomland areas well.

White Oak (Quercus alba) – White Oak Group.  Long-lived, stately tree.  Relatively early producer of very large, sweet acorns.  Acorn drop is earlier than Nuttall Oak. Grows best on moist upland soils.

Swamp Chestnut Oak (Quercus michauxii) – White Oak Group.  Large tree with flaky white/gray bark.  Relatively early producer of massive, prized acorns.  Acorn drop occurs around the same time as White Oak.  Prefers moist upland soils like its cousin the White Oak but will tolerate periodic flooding.

Sawtooth Oak (Quercus acutissima) – White Oak Group.  Non-native. Medium-sized tree with heavy branches, often full to the ground.  Very early and reliable producer of large, sweet acorns (begins producing at 5-6 years).  Begins to drop acorns in September – often the first Oak to produce mast in the season.  Grows best on moist upland soils.

Chinese Chestnut mast in October. Photo courtesy the author.

Chinese Chestnut and Chinese/American Hybrids (Castanea spp.) – Not oaks but worthy of inclusion.  Non-native or native hybrids.  Medium-sized, spreading trees.  Earliest producer of mast (3-4 years from seed germination).  Highly sought-after by deer.  Tolerates poor soils well but best production is in moist upland areas.  I’m particularly partial to the newer American/Chinese Chestnut hybrids like ‘Dunstan’ and ‘AU Buck’.

It is important to remember that success starts at planting.  Select healthy container or bare-root trees in the dormant season (December-February) and plant soon after to ensure the rootball doesn’t dry out.  Dig planting hole the same depth plants are in containers or to depth of topmost root and backfill with native soil.  Do not amend with compost or potting soil! After planting, the trees will need supplemental water, a few gallons per week, unless significant rainfall is received.  Water regularly until establishment (when they no longer need your help, generally three-six months after planting).

4′ tree grow tubes are effective at protecting young trees from deer browsing. Photo courtesy the author.

Also, recently planted seedlings will need protection from deer browsing.  Unfortunately, deer don’t realize these trees will directly benefit them in a few years and will do their best to destroy them by eating the tender new growth or “rubbing” with their antlers, girdling the trees in the process.  I’ve found that either a small 4’ high wire cage held together with zip ties works well, as do plastic grow tubes sold by many wildlife providers.   If you opt to use grow tubes, secure them with a substantial staking material such as PVC, always carefully look inside when working around the trees as tubes are magnets for wasp nests, and be vigilant in keeping fire ants out (they enjoy building their homes inside the tree tubes, the nests will often reach several feet up the tube, causing major problems for the tree!)  Finally, to maximize growth rate of your trees and expedite the mast-producing process, remove competition from the base of trees by pulling weeds or herbicide application and fertilize regularly (when growth emerges in the spring, again in early summer, and again in late summer to early fall).

As always, if you have any other questions or want more information, contact your local UF/IFAS Extension Office.  Happy planting!

 

 

 

Bobwhites in Pine Savanna Workshop

Bobwhites in Pine Savanna Workshop

‘Bobwhites in Pine Savanna’ Workshop Set
For Jan. 30 in Marianna, Florida

The National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative (NBCI) and partners will host the Tri-State Bobwhite Symposium for professional land managers and landowners Thursday, January 30, 2020, in Marianna, FL.
It is the second Working Lands for Wildlife–Bobwhites in Pine Savanna workshop funded by the Natural Resources Conservation Service and is expected to draw attendees from three states. The program goal is to restore pine savanna on 82,000 acres across seven states using thinning, prescribed fire, and native grass restoration. Federal funding is available to landowners who choose to pursue pine savanna management on that designated landscape.

Bobwhite quail are popular with many hunters and management is trying to restore them.
Photo: USDA

“Private lands are a critical and necessary component for landscape-scale restoration of wild bobwhites, which is what NBCI is all about,” said NBCI Forestry Coordinator Steve Chapman. “Active management of pine forests on those lands, while still meeting landowner objectives, is a key NBCI strategy, and 82,000 managed acres will show the dividends of this approach.”

Dr. Jess McGuire, Quail Forever’s Working Lands for Wildlife bobwhite coordinator, added that “in order to achieve this level of restoration, wildlife professionals must be trained in the nuances of bobwhite management.”
The workshop will be from 9am–2pm at the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) office, located at 2741 Penn Avenue, Suite 3, Marianna, FL 32448. Preregistration by January 23 is required by contacting jmcguire@quailforever.org or online at http://bit.ly/tristatequail.

Additional partners include Quail Forever, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Tall Timbers Research Station and Land Conservancy, University of Florida Extension, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Through multiple agreements, NBCI, in collaboration with Quail Forever and Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources/University of Georgia, will provide at least one of these workshops in each of the seven states identified in the project geography. Those states include Alabama, Florida, Georgia, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Partners will also produce educational materials detailing management techniques and the results of intentional, targeted pine savanna management for bobwhites as part of the overall project.

About NBCI
Headquartered at the University of Tennessee’s Institute of Agriculture/Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries, NBCI is a science and habitat-based initiative of the National Bobwhite Technical Committee (NBTC) to elevate bobwhite quail recovery from an individual state-by-state proposition to a coordinated, range-wide leadership endeavor to restore wild bobwhites on a landscape scale. The committee is comprised of representatives of 25 state wildlife agencies, various academic research institutions and private conservation organizations. Support for NBCI is provided by the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Program, state wildlife agencies, the Joe Crafton Family Endowment for Quail Initiatives, the University of Tennessee, Park Cities Quail and Roundstone Native Seed.

Contact:
John Doty
Communications Director
(865) 974-7281