Gardening in the Panhandle LIVE! 2021

Gardening in the Panhandle LIVE! 2021

We are back with new topics and guest speakers for 2021! All sessions are Thursdays at noon CDT or 1:00 p.m. EDT.

There are two ways to join the Gardening in the Panhandle LIVE! webinars:

1. Facebook Live – Follow us on Facebook and follow individual webinar Events.
2. Zoom Webinar – Pre-registration is required for Zoom. Users must have an authenticated account (free at https://zoom.us/signup). Be sure you have security settings up to date to prevent connection delays. Links to Zoom registration will be added to the topic one week before the webinar and a closed captioned recorded link to YouTube will be available approximately one week after the program. (Underlined words have active links!)

 

Date

Topic

Panelists

12-1 pm CDT

2/4/2021

Weeds
Reference links

Dr. Chris Marble, Beth Bolles, Mark Tancig, Larry Williams

3/11/2021

Spring Vegetables

Dr. Josh Freeman, Matt Lollar, Sheila Dunning, Evan Anderson

4/8/2021

Lawns

Dr. Bryan Unruh, Dr. Pat Williams, Mark Tancig, Larry Williams

5/13/2021

Herbs

Beth Bolles, Julie McConnell, Mary Salinas, Trevor Hylton

6/10/2021

Ornamental & Turf Diseases

Dr. Phil Harmon, Stephen Greer, Larry Williams

7/29/2021

Beneficial Insects: Predators!

Dr. Adam Dale, Beth Bolles, Julie McConnell, Danielle Sprague

8/12/2021

Open landscape topics Q&A

Beth Bolles, Mark Tancig, Matt Lollar, Evan Anderson

9/9/2021

Beginning Beekeeping

Amy Vu, Ray Bodrey, Evan Anderson

10/14/2021

Invasive Species

Dr. Stephen Enloe, Dr. Pat Williams, Dr. Gary Knox, Sheila Dunning, Ray Bodrey

11/4/2021

Houseplants

Marc Frank, Dr. Pat Williams, Stephen Greer

12/9/2021

Selecting and Maintaining Trees

Larry Figart, Mark Tancig, Larry Williams

Missed a session and want to catch up?
All webinars are archived with closed captioning on our YouTube Gardening in the Panhandle LIVE! Playlist.

 

 

Pusley Control in Florida Turfgrass

Pusley Control in Florida Turfgrass

Florida pusley has a low, spreading habit.

Florida pusley and its relatives, Brazilian and large-flower pusley, are common sights in lawns and landscapes during the summer. These prolific and tenacious weeds are closely related species in the genus Richardia, in the Rubiaceae family which includes coffee, bedstraw, and the plant from which the emetic ipecac is derived. With their thick leaves, low and spreading growing habit, and bright white flowers, they can quickly take over bare spots in a lawn and become quite a nuisance.

Because bare spots are a magnet for pusley (and weeds in general), one method to help prevent this weed from becoming a problem is to ensure the turfgrass is as healthy as possible. Well established grass can outcompete many other competitors. Keeping a lawn in tip-top shape includes watering properly, mowing at the recommended height for the grass species and variety, fertilizing appropriately, and controlling pests and diseases in a timely fashion. This can take some work in North Florida’s hot, humid climate, but prevention is almost always easier than trying to cure a problem.

Florida pusley is quickly noticed as soon as it flowers. While some may find the flowers attractive, they set seeds swiftly and before you know it, the next generation of plants is ready to go. Surprisingly, they are also an important nectar plant for honeybees. If chemical control is warranted for an infestation, a pre-emergent herbicide may help. Timing is important for this, so keep an eye on the thermometer – pre-emergents should be applied in the spring (February or March) when temperatures reach 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit for four to five days in a row. Examples are products with active ingredients such as atrazine or pendimethalin, though atrazine should not be used on bermudagrass or bahiagrass.

For weed problems that are already established, there are post-emergent herbicides available. In bahia, bermuda, and zoysia, products containing 2,4-D (or mixtures, such as 2,4-D and dicamba) can work fairly well. These products may require two applications to adequately control pusley. Be aware that some herbicides are sold under trade names that may be confusing, such as Roundup for Southern Lawns, which is a mixture of 2,4-D and penoxsulam, and is labeled for use on bahia, bermuda, St. Augustine, and zoysia grasses . It does not contain glyphosate, and Roundup that DOES contain glyphosate will kill turfgrass as well as weeds. Check the active ingredients on the herbicide label.

In St. Augustine lawns, options are more limited. Homeowners with St. Augustine may want to consider contacting a lawn care company for help with pusley. The available herbicides that are labeled for use in this instance are either difficult to use or prohibitively expensive (The herbicide Celsius, for example, costs over $100 per 10 oz. bottle). Another chemical that is effective is metsulfuron, and while it can be used in bermuda and zoysia lawns as well, it comes with some serious difficulties. First and foremost, it can be taken up by the roots of plants and is NOT safe to use around trees or shrubs. Properly measuring the chemical is tricky, as it may take only a single ounce to treat a whole acre. Serious damage can be done to surrounding plants if it is mixed or used improperly, and as such it may be difficult to find at local stores.

Homeowners who choose an herbicide to control pusley or any weed should be aware that high temperatures during the Florida summer can cause chemicals to affect the grass as well. St. Augustine is especially prone to this, and some herbicides such as 2,4-D may affect grasses more when temperatures rise above 85-90 degrees Fahrenheit.

A closeup of Florida pusley flowers.

Treatment of pusley and weeds in general is most effective when the plants are young. Large pusley plants have deeper roots and may take more applications of herbicides to control effectively. Furthermore, of the pusley species that can be found in our area, large-flower pusley is more difficult to control and may be tolerant of some chemicals. For more information, contact your local Extension office.

-Evan Anderson, Walton County Horticulture Agent

What are These Bugs in My Sod?

What are These Bugs in My Sod?

On a daily basis, it is not unusual for our Extension Office to get calls, emails, and walk-ins with questions about insect identification.  Sometimes we even get questions about imaginary insects!  The overwhelming opinion by our clientele is that the insects in question are harmful to their landscapes and gardens.  This is not always the case since there are more than 100,000 species of insects found in the United States, but less than 1% are harmful.

Recently I received a call about an abundance of bugs in a client’s newly installed sod.  He was concerned that the insects were taking over his yard.  Luckily, he was able to submit some good quality photos so the University of Florida/IFAS Extension Service could help him identify the insects.

Ground Beetle

An adult ground beetle (Mochtherus tetraspilotus). Photo Credit: Michael C. Thomas, Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services

The photos were sent to a University of Florida Entomologist for identification verification.  It turns out the insects were ground beetles (family Carabidae).  Adult ground beetles are slender and range between 1/4″ and 3/8″ in length.  Their head and thorax are much narrower than their abdomens.  Ground beetles are beneficial insects that feed on moth eggs and larvae.  They are known predators of soybean loopers, cabbage loopers, and velvetbean caterpillars.  It is suspected that the beetles found by the client came from the sod farm and were living in the thatch layer of the sod.  They were possibly feeding on sod webworms or other moth larvae.

Accurate identification is the first step of integrated pest management (IPM).  In this case, the insect found wasn’t a pest at all.  If you need help identifying an insect, feel free to contact your local Extension Agent.  For more information on beneficial insects, visit these publications found at edis.ifas.ufl.edu.

Celebrate our Pollinators This Week (and Every Week!)

Celebrate our Pollinators This Week (and Every Week!)

For the 13th year we celebrate National Pollinator Week June 22-28 to bring awareness to the importance of our pollinators and the challenges they face. This is an opportunity to learn about ways to protect pollinators in our own landscapes. Every one of us can make a difference.

When we hear the word ‘pollinator’ most of us immediately think of honeybees. They are very important but there are so many other creatures that are important pollinators:

  • Native bees – Florida alone has over 300 species of bees
  • Hummingbirds – their long beaks can reach into long, tubular blooms
  • Bats – they pollinate over 500 plants including banana, mango, and agave (used to make tequila)
  • Beetles – considered to be a messy and minor pollinator; they pollinate the native paw paw
  • Butterflies – a minor pollinator as most have long legs that keep them perched above the pollen
  • Flies – pollinators of a variety of native plants

According to the USDA, 75% of flowering plants and about 35% of food crops around the globe rely on these animals for pollination. Without pollination, these plants would not reproduce or provide us food.

So, what can the average person do to make a difference?

  • Plant what bees and butterflies love!
  • Avoid using any insecticide unless it is absolutely necessary. Predators like assassin bugs, dragonflies and birds help to keep pests in check. Our songbirds rely on protein-rich insects (especially caterpillars) to feed their growing babies.
  • Don’t treat areas where pollinators are visiting the flowers, whether in the lawn or the landscape beds.
  • If you need to apply an insecticide to the lawn, mow first to remove the blooms from any weeds. Always follow the label instructions carefully.
  • Avoid using a systemic insecticide on plants that bloom and attract pollinators. The insecticide can remain in plants for a long time.

Happy gardening during National Pollinator Week!

For more information:

Pollinator Partnership: Pollinator Week Activities

US Fish & Wildlife Pollinator Site

Native Insect Pollinators of the Southeastern United States brochure

Purdue University: Protecting Pollinators in Home Lawns and Landscapes

Minimizing Honey Bee Exposure to Pesticides

Why Can’t I Kill Weeds?

Why Can’t I Kill Weeds?

Why are the plants we are trying not to grow so hard to kill? Weeds can be quite frustrating to home gardeners as they struggle to get them under control. There are a few things you can do to help make your efforts more successful.

Identify the weed. It might seem like it doesn’t matter what the plant is if you know you want to get rid of it, but a big part of your strategy should be figuring out why that plant is being so difficult. Below are the reasons why weed identification is so critical in your fight to control it.

  • Which plant are you favoring with your maintenance routine? All plants have similar basic needs: water, sunlight, nutrients, and a space to grow, but some perform better with varying amounts of each of these inputs. Sometimes we can influence these factors in a way that favors one plant over another. The best example is how we irrigate our landscape. If you plant drought tolerant shrubs, such as Indian Hawthorne, which can survive with little to no irrigation after establishment, and then continue to water 2-3 times a week, is it any wonder that you get water loving weeds such as dollarweed, torpedograss, or sedge? Only apply inputs that support your desirable plants and nothing more.
  • Recognize the weed type. There are three main types of weeds we typically encounter: broadleaf, grass, or sedge. Some herbicides are broad-spectrum, which means they kill any type of plant, while others are selective. Selective herbicides generally target either broadleaf, grass or sedge weeds and have minimal impact on the other types. This can be very important information to have if you are shopping for an herbicide.
  • Understand the life cycle. Herbaceous plants fall into three main life cycle categories: annual, perennial, or biennial. Annuals and biennials tend to reproduce primarily from seed. The annual plant completes its entire life cycle in one season or year and a biennial takes two years. When targeting these two, your goal is to get rid of the plant before it flowers and sets seed to reduce future crops. If you miss that window and the weeds go to seed, plan to use a pre-emergent herbicide prior to their next scheduled germination date (usually the next season). Perennials live for more than 2 years and tend to be tough to manage. They may reproduce by seed but many also multiply by vegetative means. To put this simply, they store everything they need in tiny pieces of the plant and if left in place, it will generate more plants. So, that little tiny root fragment from dollar weed you didn’t pull up – yep, it’ll grow a whole new one in its place!

For more information on weeds and weed control in lawns and landscapes, contact your local UF/IFAS County Extension Office!