In this Issue:
  • “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya
  • Florida Master Naturalist Program
  • Exploring the Economic, Environmental and Social Issues Impacting the Coastal Dune Lakes
  • The Benefits of a Living Shoreline
  • The Bumble Bee – One of Florida’s Vital Pollinators
  • Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions
  • Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL
  • Celebrating Choctawhatchee Bay – National Estuaries Week
  • Biking to a Healthier Community
  • Transient Birds and Beach House Refuge
  • Habitat Conservation

    “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya

    Having just completed the Okaloosa/Walton Uplands Master Naturalist course, I would like to share information from the project that was presented by Ann Foley.   The Florida Torreya is the most endangered tree in North America, and perhaps the world! Less than 1% of the historical population survives. Unless something is done soon, it may …

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    Florida Master Naturalist Program

    The Florida Master Naturalist Program is an adult education University of Florida/IFAS Extension program. Training will benefit persons interested in learning more about Florida’s environment or wishing to increase their knowledge for use in education programs as volunteers, employees, ecotourism guides, and others. Through classroom, field trip, and practical experience, each module provides instruction on the …

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    Exploring the Economic, Environmental and Social Issues Impacting the Coastal Dune Lakes

    On a beautiful October day, 35 people gathered at the Camp Helen State Park lodge to share information about the rare Coastal Dune Lakes (CDLs) that line the coast of Walton and Bay Counties. Organized by the University of Florida Extension Programs in Bay and Walton counties, the Water School included a morning seminar series …

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    The Benefits of a Living Shoreline

    Imagine this… You are a sailor on a 16th century Spanish galleon anchored in a Florida Bay south of Tampa. You, along with others, are ordered to go ashore for a scouting trip to set up a base camp.  You transfer over to a small skiff and row ashore to find a forest of root …

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    The Bumble Bee – One of Florida’s Vital Pollinators

    “The happiness of the bee and the dolphin is to exist. For man it is to know that and to wonder at it.” Jacques Yves Cousteau Bumble bees are among the most recognizable types of insects. They are large, colorful, and a wonder to watch.  They’re also popularized in media, cartoons, and clip-art images, but …

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    Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions

    Life on the coast has tremendous benefits; steady sea breezes, gorgeous beaches, plentiful fishing and paddling opportunities. Nevertheless, there are definite downsides to living along it, too. Besides storms like Hurricane Harvey making semi-regular appearances, our proximity to the water can make us more vulnerable to flooding and waterborne hazards ranging from bacteria to jellyfish. …

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    Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL

    A “Gardening for Pollinator Conservation” Workshop will take place Thursday, October 13, at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. Pollinators are important in conserving native plants, ensuring a plentiful food supply, encouraging biodiversity and helping maintain a healthier ecological environment – – – the so-called “balance of nature.” Come learn …

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    Celebrating Choctawhatchee Bay – National Estuaries Week

    September 17-24, 2016 was the nation’s 28th time to celebrate America’s coasts and estuaries during National Estuaries Week.  This week helps us to remember to appreciate the challenges these coastal ecosystems face, along with their beauty and utility. Estuaries, semi-enclosed bodies of water with both fresh and saltwater, dot the Gulf Coast of the United …

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    Biking to a Healthier Community

    If you told me earlier this summer that I would “accidentally” bike 18 miles one afternoon, I’d have laughed. I’ve always loved biking, but rarely have time for long distance rides. As part of the mobile workshops for an Extension professional development meeting in Burlington, Vermont, fifteen of us met up with the coordinator of …

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    Transient Birds and Beach House Refuge

    Birds, migration, and climate change. Mix them all together and intuitively, we can imagine an ecological train wreck in the making. Many migratory bird species have seen their numbers plummet over the past half-century – due not to climate change, but to habitat loss in the places they frequent as part of their jet-setting life …

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