In this Issue:
  • The Wacissa River: Clear and Wild
  • A Look at Some of Our Colorful and Intriguing Native Bees
  • Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife
  • Researchers Test Traps for Controlling Deepwater Invasive Lionfish
  • Let’s Cool Off
  • Septic systems: What should you do when a flood occurs?
  • The Armored Wanderer – the armadillo
  • It is March and Snakes are on the Move
  • Two Manatees in Two Weeks
  • Aliens are invading – NISAW 2018
  • Natural Resources

    The Wacissa River: Clear and Wild

    Being off the beaten path has many advantages. In the case of a spring-fed river, it translates to less pressure from human use and a great opportunity for those who do visit to experience the “real Florida”. The Wacissa River, located in the southern half of Jefferson County, Florida, is near the crossroads identified as …

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    A Look at Some of Our Colorful and Intriguing Native Bees

    Beekeeping is thriving in Panhandle Florida and the importance of honeybee health and pollination is frequently in the news.  As much as 1/3 of our food supply depends on the pollinating activities of honeybees, and because of this fact, pollinator protection was formally recognized at the federal level in 2014 when the President of the …

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    Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife

    It’s that time of year when landowners, hunters, and other wildlife enthusiasts begin to plan and prepare fall and winter food plots to attract wildlife like the nice buck in the photo. Annual food plots are expensive and labor intensive to plant every year and with that thought in mind, an option you may want …

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    Researchers Test Traps for Controlling Deepwater Invasive Lionfish

    Written By: Laura Tiu, Holden Harris, and Alexander Fogg It’s early morning as Dreadknot Charters speeds out of Destin Harbor towards the offshore reefs in the Gulf of Mexico. Researchers Holden Harris (Graduate Research Fellow, University of Florida), Alex Fogg, (Marine Resource Coordinator, Okaloosa County), and the Dreadknot crew, Josh and Joe Livingston, ready their …

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    Let’s Cool Off

    With more than 250 crystal clear springs in Northwest Florida it is just a short road trip to a pristine swimming hole! Springs and their associated flowing water bodies provide important habitat for wildlife and plants. Just as importantly, springs provide people with recreational activities and the opportunity to connect with the natural environment. While …

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    Septic systems: What should you do when a flood occurs?

    Approximately 30% of Florida’s population relies on septic systems, or onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems (OSTDS), to treat and dispose of household wastewater. This includes all water from bathrooms and kitchens, and laundry machines. When properly maintained, septic systems can last 25-30 years, and maintenance costs are relatively low. In a nutshell, the most …

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    The Armored Wanderer – the armadillo

    The first light of morning can reveal random pockmarks in what had been the perfect lawn the previous evening. The culprit is not likely the neighborhood teenager with a reputation for inappropriate practical jokes. The offender usually is the nine-banded armadillo, sometimes referred to as a Florida-speed-bump or Possum-on-the-half-shell. In addition to manicured landscapes, they …

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    It is March and Snakes are on the Move

    Most people know that snakes are ectothermic and the environment is what regulates their body temperature. However, many do not know that they like to maintain their temperature close to 98 F like us.  To do this they must move to locations where they can either warm (like basking in the sun or lying on …

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    Two Manatees in Two Weeks

    As a young boy growing up here in the panhandle, I had heard of this thing called a manatee – but had never seen one. They came more into the light when I was a teenager and becoming interested in marine biology.  I was the president of the high school marine biology club and one …

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    Aliens are invading – NISAW 2018

    Aliens are invading our forests, pastures, fields and lawns. Well, okay, it’s not aliens but it is invasive species.  Invasive species are non-native or exotic species that do not naturally occur in an area, cause economic or environmental harm, or negatively impact human health.  These invasive species have become the number one threat to biodiversity …

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