In this Issue:
  • Maintain Your Septic System to Save Money and Reduce Water Pollution
  • Sea Grant Publications on the Impacts of the BP Oil Spill
  • Slow the flow: Why should we care about stormwater runoff?
  • What Cause the Toxic Algal Bloom in South Florida and Could It Happen Here?
  • Bacteria at the Beach
  • Oil Spill Science: Five years later, what have we learned?
  • NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida
  • When Will the Red Tide End?
  • It’s Happening … Red Tide
  • National Estuaries Week! – Problems in Our Bays
  • Water Quality

    Maintain Your Septic System to Save Money and Reduce Water Pollution

    One third of homes in Florida rely on septic systems, or onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems (OSTDS), to treat and dispose of household wastewater, which includes wastewater from bathrooms, kitchen sinks and laundry machines. When properly maintained, septic systems can last 25-30 years, and maintenance costs are relatively low. A general rule of thumb …

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    Sea Grant Publications on the Impacts of the BP Oil Spill

      We are pleased to announce the release of a pair of new bulletins outlining how the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted the popular marine animals dolphins and sea turtles. To read these and other oil spill science publications, go to http://gulfseagrant.org/oilspilloutreach/publications/.    The Deepwater Horizon’s impact on bottlenose dolphins – In 2010, scientists …

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    Slow the flow: Why should we care about stormwater runoff?

    Stormwater runoff is water from rainfall that flows along the land surface. This runoff usually finds its way into the nearest ditch or water body, such as a river, stream, lake or pond. Generally speaking, in natural undeveloped areas only 10% of rainfall is runoff. About 40% returns to the atmosphere though evapotranspiration, which is …

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    What Cause the Toxic Algal Bloom in South Florida and Could It Happen Here?

    Most of us have heard about the toxic algal blooms plaguing south Florida waters. If not, check out http://www.cnbc.com/2016/07/05/.  This bloom has caused several major fish kills, bad odors, and has kept tourist away from the area.  What happen? and could it happen in the panhandle? First we have to understand what happened in south …

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    Bacteria at the Beach

    The threat of bacteria in coastal waters can be scary and a challenge to understand. Here is information that helps clarify the threat to beach visitors and recreational users of marine waters. This is a good opportunity to think about bacteria exposure risks related to the coastal environment that we can control. It is important …

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    Oil Spill Science: Five years later, what have we learned?

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill occurred about 50 miles offshore of Louisiana in April 2010. Approximately 172 million gallons of oil entered the Gulf of Mexico. Five years after the incident, locals and tourists still have questions. This article addresses the five most common questions. QUESTION #1: Is Gulf seafood safe to eat? Ongoing …

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    NISAW 2016 – Working together to remove Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) from Northwest Florida

        Matthew Phillips and Scott Jackson – UF/IFAS Extension and Research works with many partners supporting invasive species management actions and strategies across Florida. One key partner is the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conserva­tion Commission (FWC), Invasive Plant Management Section. FWC Biologists provide resources and expertise to address threats from Florida’s most disruptive invasive …

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    When Will the Red Tide End?

    This is a question I have been asked several times in the last week. As most of you know the red tide that has been occurring off the panhandle the last few months is still around. Dead fish were reported on Pensacola Beach again the weekend of Dec 12-13 and a few people said they …

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    It’s Happening … Red Tide

     Many coastal Panhandlers woke up this week to the sight and smell of dead fish. Thousands of them washed ashore from Panama City to Pensacola. This mass die off included a variety of species including whiting, sheepshead, hake, cusk eels, and even lionfish; there were also reports of dead bass from the Dune Lakes in …

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    National Estuaries Week! – Problems in Our Bays

    I don’t want this to sound like a “Debbie Downer”… but there are problems with our estuaries and panhandle residents should be aware of them. There are things you can do to correct them – which we will discuss in the final issues of this series – but you need to understand the problem to …

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