Monthly Archive: February 2015

Invasive Species of the Day: Cuban Tree Frog and Hydrilla

Cuban Treefrog (Osteopilus septentrionalis): The Cuban Treefrog: was introduced into Florida as a stowaway on vehicles and plants in the 1920’s. As of 2013, breeding populations have been recorded as far north as Georgia. Cuban Treefrogs have larger toepads and eyes than any of the native species. Being larger in size, the Cuban Treefrog out-competes …

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Invasive Species of the Day: Tiger Prawn and Climbing Ferns

Giant Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon): Giant Tiger Prawn: This large shrimp, also known as the Asian Tiger Shrimp and the Black Tiger Shrimp, can reach lengths between 8-12 inches.  It resembles are native edible penaeid shrimp but differs in that it has distinct black and yellow stripes. It was brought to the U.S. from the Indo-Pacific …

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Invasive Species of the Day (February 25): Coral Ardisia and Wild Hogs

Coral Ardisia (Ardisia crenata):   Coral ardisia is also known as coral berry, spice berry, and scratchthroat. It was introduced into Florida in the early 1900’s for ornamental purposes. In the ensuing years, it has since it escaped cultivation and has become established in hardwood hammocks and other moist woods of natural areas and grazing lands. …

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Invasive Species of the Day (February 24): Lionfish and Air Potato

Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   Red Lionfish are a predatory reef fish that are non-native invasive species and have spread throughout Florida Waters.  They are members of the family Scorpaenidae whose members are venomous and the lionfish is no exception.  This fish is relatively small ranging from 10-12 inches in length and have a zebra-like appearance with …

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Invasive Species of the Day (February 23): Kudzu Bugs and Beach Vitex

Kudzu Bug (Megacopta cribraria): Florida is extending a warm welcome to a new pest!  In 2012, the Kudzu bug made its first appearance in our state.  And they are settling in to stay.  The kudzu bug was first documented in the US in 2009 in Northeast Georgia.  It has quickly spread throughout the southeast. At …

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) – February 22-28, 2015

Many plants and animals have been introduced to new regions for centuries, as people have discovered new lands.  These transient species are known as non-natives, and can become invasive. Invasive species occur throughout the world and may blend in, be nondescript or highly attractive; they can be plant or animal; terrestrial or aquatic; they may …

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1st Annual Statewide Nonnative Fish Catch, Click, and Submit Contest

The Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA) is organizing a nonnative freshwater fishing tournament for Invasive Species Week.   Begins:             6:00 AM Saturday February 21, 2015 Ends:               12:00 AM Sunday March 1, 2015   OBJECTIVES FOR TOURNAMENT Document the distribution of freshwater nonnative fish in Florida Increase awareness of the problem with nonnative freshwater …

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Discovering Florida’s Panhandle – Barrier Islands – February 2015

Making the Big Sabine hike on Santa Rosa Island in February was COLD! A front had pasted over the day before and temp was in the 30’s with a north wind. But the sky was a beautiful blue and the Gulf was calm and clear.     Joining me on my hike this month was …

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Check Those Passalong Plants

It’s Growing So Well It Must Be A Good Plant. Right? You know that plant in the corner of the yard that seems to be taking over? It’s the one that your friend “passed along” because they had plenty of them and wanted to share. After all, it grows so well. How can you go …

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Working to Restore Oyster Habitat

Nature has provided us with an incredible resource in the diverse assemblage of molluscan shellfish that inhabit our coastal bays and estuaries. One bivalve species in particular provides many human benefits. The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) has not only proven to be a preferred food species for people but also derives many vital ecosystem services through …

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