In this Issue:
  • Two Words, Six Americas: Finding common ground on climate change
  • Hurricanes and floods: Meeting the resource needs of private well owners
  • “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya
  • Two Manatees in Two Weeks
  • The Marshes, they are a-changin’
  • Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions
  • Finding Common Ground on Climate Change
  • With Hurricane Season Approaching, Are You Prepared for an Evacuation?
  • Man, It Has Been a Weird Winter
  • The Once Mightier Ochlockonee, Dismembered by Sea Level Rise
  • Climate

    Two Words, Six Americas: Finding common ground on climate change

    Climate change. Those two simple words have the power to bring about a strong reaction in people. For many, the term is fraught with emotion—with worry, anger, and fear of the unknown. For others, these two words might elicit doubt or frustration. According to a multi-year, nationwide study conducted by George Mason and Yale Universities, …

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    Hurricanes and floods: Meeting the resource needs of private well owners

    As hurricane season is upon us again, I wanted to share the results of work that UF/IFAS Extension staff did with collaborators from Virginia Tech and Texas A&M University to help private well owners impacted by Hurricanes Irma and Harvey last year. This work highlights just how important it is to be prepared for this …

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    “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya

    Having just completed the Okaloosa/Walton Uplands Master Naturalist course, I would like to share information from the project that was presented by Ann Foley.   The Florida Torreya is the most endangered tree in North America, and perhaps the world! Less than 1% of the historical population survives. Unless something is done soon, it may …

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    Two Manatees in Two Weeks

    As a young boy growing up here in the panhandle, I had heard of this thing called a manatee – but had never seen one. They came more into the light when I was a teenager and becoming interested in marine biology.  I was the president of the high school marine biology club and one …

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    The Marshes, they are a-changin’

    Discovering something new is possibly the most exciting thing a field biologist can do. As students, budding biologists imagine coming across something no one else has ever noticed before, maybe even getting the opportunity to name a new bird, fish, or plant after themselves. Well, here in Pensacola, we are discovering something that, while already …

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    Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions

    Life on the coast has tremendous benefits; steady sea breezes, gorgeous beaches, plentiful fishing and paddling opportunities. Nevertheless, there are definite downsides to living along it, too. Besides storms like Hurricane Harvey making semi-regular appearances, our proximity to the water can make us more vulnerable to flooding and waterborne hazards ranging from bacteria to jellyfish. …

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    Finding Common Ground on Climate Change

    Climate change is one of those topics that most people don’t want to think much about. It can be overwhelming, it can be controversial, and it can be downright frightening. A year ago, Yale and George Mason University completed the most recent surveys in the “Six Americas” study, which determined levels of belief and concern …

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    With Hurricane Season Approaching, Are You Prepared for an Evacuation?

    Hurricane season begins this year on June 1st and ends November 30th. As Floridians, we face the possibility of hurricanes each year. This simply goes with the territory. During these months, it’s important to plan for the threat of a hurricane, and at the same time hope, it never happens. First and foremost, you may …

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    Man, It Has Been a Weird Winter

    It was February 13, 2017 and the temperature was 74°F… 74!   It has been one strange winter.  The azaleas in my yard have already bloomed, friends of mine have seen butterflies already forming chrysalis, and I have already had to deal with mosquitos; all of this in February.  But, even as we talk about how …

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    The Once Mightier Ochlockonee, Dismembered by Sea Level Rise

    What do the Ochlockonee and Aucilla rivers have in common? Not much, it would seem, beyond the fact that both have headwaters in Georgia and flow through Florida to the Gulf of Mexico. These two rivers do share the distinction of being unusual, although they’re unusual in very different ways. The Aucilla is a blackwater stream …

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