In this Issue:
  • Florida’s Water Quality Woes
  • Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – Fecal Bacteria
  • ACF Water War Update: US Supreme Court Rules on Florida v. Georgia
  • Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time
  • Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – Bioaccumulation of Toxins
  • Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – A Florida Friendly Yard
  • Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – Sediments
  • Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, what can you do to help? Biodiversity
  • Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay; what can you do to help? Introduction
  • Meanwhile, Back at the Oyster Ranch…
  • Estuaries

    Florida’s Water Quality Woes

    Being in the panhandle of Florida you may, or may not, have heard about the water quality issues hindering the southern part of the state. Water discharged from Lake Okeechobee is full of nutrients.  These nutrients are coming from agriculture, unmaintained septic tanks, and developed landscaping – among other things.  The discharges that head east …

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    Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – Fecal Bacteria

    Of all the issues facing our local estuaries, high levels of fecal bacteria is the one that hinders commercial and recreational use the most. When bacteria levels increase and health advisories are issued, people become leery of swimming, paddling, or consuming seafood from these waterways. I have been following the fecal bacteria situation in the …

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    ACF Water War Update: US Supreme Court Rules on Florida v. Georgia

    If you have not seen the news yet, the US Supreme Court provided a ruling on June 27, 2018 regarding the decades-long conflict between Florida and Georgia over water use in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint tri-state river basin. Guess what; the battle continues. Following the previous findings of the court-appointed Special Master and his recommendation to deny …

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    Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time

    Florida’s rivers, springs, wetlands, and estuaries are central features to the identity of northwest Florida. They provide a wide range of services that benefit peoples’ health and well-being in our region. They create recreational opportunities for swimmers, canoers, and kayakers; support diverse wildlife for birders and plant enthusiasts; sustain a vibrant commercial and recreational fishery …

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    Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – Bioaccumulation of Toxins

    What is bioaccumulation of toxins?   Our bodies come in contact, and produce, toxins every day. The production of toxins can result during simple metabolism of food.  However, our bodies are designed with a system to rid us of these toxins.  Toxins are processed by our immune system and removed via our kidneys.  Some chemical …

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    Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – A Florida Friendly Yard

    We have been posting articles discussing some of the issues our estuaries are facing; this post will focus on one of the things you can do to help reduce the problem – a Florida Friendly Yard. The University of Florida IFAS developed the Florida Friendly Landscaping Program. It was developed to be included in the …

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    Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, What Can You Do to Help? – Sediments

    In the mid 1990’s, the Bay Area Resource Council was created. This multi-county (Escambia and Santa Rosa) organization included local scientists and decision makers to help better understand the health of Pensacola Bay, develop a plan for restoration, and work collaboratively to acquire funding to do so.  At the inaugural meeting, many different scientists spoke …

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    Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay, what can you do to help? Biodiversity

    Records of the variety of aquatic life in Pensacola Bay go back to the 18th century.  According to these reports, over 1400 species of plants and animals call Pensacola Bay home.  Many of them depend on seagrass, oyster reefs, or marshes to complete their life cycle.  The greatest diversity and abundance are found on the …

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    Restoring the Health of Pensacola Bay; what can you do to help? Introduction

    Humans have inhabited the shores of Pensacola Bay for centuries. Impacts on the ecology have happened all along, but the major impacts have occurred in the latter half of the 20th century.  There has been an increase in human population, an increase in development, a decrease in water clarity, a decrease in seagrasses, and a …

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    Meanwhile, Back at the Oyster Ranch…

    Photo: Erik Lovestrand There are a number of parallels than can be drawn between shellfish farming and traditional forms of agriculture that take place on the land. The most obvious similarities are the amount of hard work, grit and faith that are required of the farmer on land or sea. In spite of this there …

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