In this Issue:
  • Ready for Northwest Florida Artificial Reef Workshop Wednesday February 22
  • Transient Birds and Beach House Refuge
  • Oil Spill Science Seminar held in Okaloosa County
  • Sea Grant Monitors Occurrence of Goliath Groupers in the Panhandle
  • National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) – February 22-28, 2015
  • Cool Season Wildlife Food Plots
  • Living with Florida Snakes
  • Beach Mice of Florida
  • Prevent Tick-borne Illnesses in Florida
  • Living with Coyotes
  • Research

    Ready for Northwest Florida Artificial Reef Workshop Wednesday February 22

    Researchers from University of West Florida recently estimated the value of Artificial Reefs to Florida’s coastal economy. Bay County artificial reefs provide 49.02 million dollars annually in personal income to local residents.  Bay County ranks 8th in the state of Florida with 1,936 fishing and diving jobs. This important economic study gives updated guidance and …

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    Transient Birds and Beach House Refuge

    Birds, migration, and climate change. Mix them all together and intuitively, we can imagine an ecological train wreck in the making. Many migratory bird species have seen their numbers plummet over the past half-century – due not to climate change, but to habitat loss in the places they frequent as part of their jet-setting life …

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    Oil Spill Science Seminar held in Okaloosa County

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill occurred about 50 miles offshore of Louisiana in April 2010. Approximately 172 million gallons of oil entered the Gulf of Mexico. Five years after the incident, locals and tourists still have questions. The Okaloosa County UF/IFAS Extension Office invited a Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Scientist, Dr. Monica Wilson, …

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    Sea Grant Monitors Occurrence of Goliath Groupers in the Panhandle

    For several years now Dr. Angela Collins, with Florida Sea Grant, has been conducting research on the status of the Goliath Grouper.  This extremely large member of the Family Serranidae has been of concern to fishermen, divers, and resource managers in south Florida.  The harvest of goliath groupers has been prohibited since 1990 but their populations …

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    National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) – February 22-28, 2015

    Many plants and animals have been introduced to new regions for centuries, as people have discovered new lands.  These transient species are known as non-natives, and can become invasive. Invasive species occur throughout the world and may blend in, be nondescript or highly attractive; they can be plant or animal; terrestrial or aquatic; they may …

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    Cool Season Wildlife Food Plots

    It’s time to start planning your cool season wildlife food plots. Cool season food plots do a great job attracting deer and other wildlife to your property as well as providing a little nutrition. The first step is to choose an appropriate location. Remember wildlife like to stay close to cover but plants also need …

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    Living with Florida Snakes

    Warming temperatures have awaken snakes that have been dormant during the winter months.  As a result, they are more active during abnormal times of the day and move more than they typically do while searching for food.  This also means more people are likely to encounter with them. Even though most snakes are nonvenomous, many people …

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    Beach Mice of Florida

    Sea Turtles are one of the largest and most beloved animals associated with Florida coastal habitats. However, there is a tiny creature that depends on the coastal dune system that few get a chance to see, the beach mouse. As the name implies, beach mice make their home on beaches and in nearby dunes. These mice …

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    Prevent Tick-borne Illnesses in Florida

    This fall remains mild despite a couple of recent frosty mornings. With mild temperatures comes ticks.  Ticks carry and transmit several diseases. Brown dog ticks are found mainly on dogs and can carry Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever. American dog ticks are also usually found on dogs but will also attach to other mammals and humans.  They also …

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    Living with Coyotes

    Coyotes can be a nuisance to pet and livestock owners as well as vegetable farmers. They are true scavengers and will eat just about anything – sheep, calves, poultry, deer, watermelons, snakes, foxes, cats, rabbits, grass, carrion, pet food… Although they are mainly active at night, coyotes can be seen during daylight hours close to …

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