Tag Archive: Lionfish

DNA Barcoding Our Way into Understanding the Lionfish Problem

In the late 1980’s a few exotic lionfish were found off the coast of Dania Florida. I do not think anyone foresaw the impact this was going to have.  Producing tens of thousands of drifting eggs per female each week, they began to disperse following the Gulf Stream.  First in northeast Florida, then the Carolina’s, …

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The Inaugural 2016 FWC Lionfish Challenge has come to an End… So What Now?

Most coastal residents along the panhandle are aware of the invasive lionfish and the potential impacts they could have on local fisheries and ecosystems. Since they were first detected in this area in 2010, there have been tournaments, workshops, and presentations, to help locals both learn about the animal and ways to control them.  Existing …

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NISAW 2016 – An Update on the Lionfish Situation in the Panhandle

Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   An Update on the Lionfish Situation in the Panhandle In the past couple of years, we have posted articles about the lionfish during NISAW week.  A question we hear more now is – “how is lionfish management going?” First, they are still here… Wish I could say otherwise, but they are …

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It’s Thanksgiving… That Means Time for “Turkeyfish”

Everyone knows there are “sea horses”, “sea cows”, “catfish”, and “dogfish” but a ”turkeyfish”? Is there such a thing as a “turkey fish”? Well yes there is!… its scientific name is Pterois volitans but most know it as the LIONFISH. Yep, our old friend the lionfish. Some of us first heard about the lionfish several …

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Invasive Species of the Day (February 24): Lionfish and Air Potato

Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   Red Lionfish are a predatory reef fish that are non-native invasive species and have spread throughout Florida Waters.  They are members of the family Scorpaenidae whose members are venomous and the lionfish is no exception.  This fish is relatively small ranging from 10-12 inches in length and have a zebra-like appearance with …

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week (NISAW) – February 22-28, 2015

Many plants and animals have been introduced to new regions for centuries, as people have discovered new lands.  These transient species are known as non-natives, and can become invasive. Invasive species occur throughout the world and may blend in, be nondescript or highly attractive; they can be plant or animal; terrestrial or aquatic; they may …

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Invasive Species of the Day (March 3rd): Wild Hogs & Lion Fish

March 3rd: Wild Hogs (Sus scrofa) & Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   Wild Hogs: Wild Hogs, also called Feral Hogs, are not native to the U.S.  Domesticated pigs were introduced by early settlers because they could adapt to a wide variety of habitats.  These pigs were kept on open ranges and used as a food source …

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2013 Lionfish Summit; update on FWC meeting in Cocoa Beach

It seems everyone in the Panhandle is talking about the invasive lionfish. This non-native member of the scorpionfish family was first seen in U.S. waters in 1989 near Ft. Lauderdale.  Over the last two decades, much has been learned about the biology and potential impacts of lionfish in our waters; For additional background information you …

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Invasive Species of the Day Series (March 3rd): Tropical Soda Apple & Lionfish

National Invasive Species Awareness Week: March 3rd – March 8th March 3rd: Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum) & Lionfish (Pterois volitans): Tropical Soda Apple: Florida ranchers know Tropical Soda Apple (TSA) as the “Plant from Hell.” It was first noticed in south Florida, but its seeds survive in the digestive tracts of animals and it …

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The Invasion of the Lionfish

The Invasion of the Lionfish   (Photo: Florida Sea Grant)   It is a song that has been played in our state time and again.  An exotic pet or plant is brought across our borders and either intentionally or accidentally released into the environment.  Tropical fish, exotic reptiles, and nonnative mammals escape and the next …

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