In this Issue:
  • Florida Natives: Florida Red Anise
  • Acorns Abound!
  • What Plant is This?
  • American Beech–an American Beauty
  • The Color of Fall in the Panhandle
  • Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL
  • Florida Wildflowers: Blazing Star
  • Saltbush–a Native Beauty, of Sorts
  • Attract Pollinators with Dotted Horsemint
  • Go Native: Rainlilies!
  • Native plants

    Florida Natives: Florida Red Anise

    Springtime brings small but very pretty red blooms on an outstanding native shrub/small tree, Florida red anise (Illicium floridanum). It occurs naturally in the wild in the central and western panhandle of Florida and west along the gulf coast into Louisiana. Its natural environment is in the understory along streams and in rich, wooded areas. …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/03/09/florida-natives-florida-red-anise/

    Acorns Abound!

    Do you have more acorns than you know what to do with? When oaks produce loads of acorns, it sometimes is called a “mast” year. Do you remember the oak tree pollen and all those catkins that fell from oaks earlier in spring? Catkins are the male flowers in oaks. Some people refer to them …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/01/26/acorns-abound/

    What Plant is This?

    A common diagnostic service offered at your local UF/IFAS Extension office is plant identification. Whether you need a persistent weed identified so you can implement a management program or you need to identify an ornamental plant and get care recommendations, we can help! In the past, we were reliant on people to bring a sample …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/01/17/what-plant-is-this/

    American Beech–an American Beauty

    During a recent hike through wooded property in Walton County, our Florida Master Naturalist class came across a stunning example of an American Beech tree (Fagus grandifolia). As we looked closely at its thick, sinewy trunk (often compared to an elephant’s skin), the bark changed hues from a deep red to silvery gray and brown. …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/11/22/american-beech-an-american-beauty/

    The Color of Fall in the Panhandle

    Each fall, nature puts on a brilliant show of color throughout the United States. As the temperatures drop, autumn encourages the “leaf peepers” to hit the road in search of the red-, yellow- and orange-colored leaves of the northern deciduous trees. In Northwest Florida the color of autumn isn’t just from trees. The reds, purples, …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/10/07/the-color-of-fall-in-the-panhandle/

    Gardening for Pollinator Conservation Workshop – October 13th, Quincy FL

    A “Gardening for Pollinator Conservation” Workshop will take place Thursday, October 13, at the UF/IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center (NFREC) in Quincy. Pollinators are important in conserving native plants, ensuring a plentiful food supply, encouraging biodiversity and helping maintain a healthier ecological environment – – – the so-called “balance of nature.” Come learn …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/10/07/gardening-for-pollinator-conservation-workshop-october-13th-quincy-fl/

    Florida Wildflowers: Blazing Star

    The Florida panhandle has a treasure of native wildflowers to enjoy in every season of the year. In the late summer and fall, blazing star, also commonly known as gayfeather, can be found blooming in natural areas and along roadsides. You can also add it to your landscape to provide beautiful fall color and interest …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/09/22/florida-wildflowers-blazing-star/

    Saltbush–a Native Beauty, of Sorts

    In the spring and summer, no one notices the little green shrub hidden among wax myrtle and marsh elder at the edge of the salt marsh. However, if I’m leading a group of students or a Master Naturalist class through the same area in the fall, it’s the first plant people ask about. The saltbush …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/09/16/saltbush-a-native-beauty-of-sorts/

    Attract Pollinators with Dotted Horsemint

    If you are looking for a late summer blooming plant that attracts pollinators and survives in a tough spot, dotted horsemint (Monarda punctata) is for you! This native plant thrives in sunny, well-drained sites but will also tolerate moist garden spots. It grows quickly and blooms prolifically – attracting pollinators by the dozens. A plant …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/09/16/attract-pollinators-with-dotted-horsemint/

    Go Native: Rainlilies!

    Florida is home to many gorgeous and desirable native plant species. One to consider for your landscape is the rainlily, Zephyranthes and Habranthus spp. They are easy to care for and are bothered by few pests. As the name implies, rainlilies do thrive when getting consistent rain or watering. A good soaking rain event will …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/09/02/go-native-rainlilies/

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