In this Issue:
  • Florida Natives: Stokes’ Aster
  • Landscaping in Coastal Areas
  • Know How to Choose Florida-Friendly Plants
  • My Tree Has Tumors
  • Tired of Turf? Try Groundcover Alternatives Instead!
  • Native Shrub Option for Sandy Soils
  • Florida Natives: Florida Red Anise
  • Acorns Abound!
  • What Plant is This?
  • American Beech–an American Beauty
  • Native plants

    Florida Natives: Stokes’ Aster

    Florida is home to some of the most beautiful flowering perennials. An exceptional one for the panhandle landscape is Stokes’ aster (Stokesia laevis) as it is showy, deer resistant and easy to care for. Unlike other perennials, it generally is evergreen in our region so it provides interest all year. The original species of Stokes’ …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/06/22/florida-natives-stokes-aster/

    Landscaping in Coastal Areas

    People from other parts of the country often move into Florida with expectations of their landscape beyond its capabilities. Those gorgeous peonies that grew up north or the perfect tomatoes they grew in California seem to wither in the heat or succumb to any number of insect or fungal pests. Adapting to our conditions takes …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/06/15/landscaping-in-coastal-areas/

    Know How to Choose Florida-Friendly Plants

    One of the main Florida-Friendly Landscaping principles is to plant the right plant in the right place. In Florida, not only does this apply to the zone you’re in, soils you have, and light conditions in your garden, but also ensuring that invasive, exotic plant species are not used. While most of us have heard …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/05/25/know-how-to-choose-florida-friendly-plants/

    My Tree Has Tumors

    As oak trees are now fully leafing out and people start hanging out in the shade of the canopy, many of you are noticing strange growths on the branches. They look like potatoes, spiky cones and fuzz balls on the leaves and stems.  Don’t worry.  It’s just a harmless wasp that chose that tree to …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/05/25/my-tree-has-tumors/

    Tired of Turf? Try Groundcover Alternatives Instead!

    If you’re like me, growing turfgrass is often more of a hassle than anything else.  Regardless of the species you plant, none tolerates shade well and it can seem like there is a never-ending list of chores and expenses that accompany lawn grass:  mowing (at least one a week during the summer), fertilizing, and constantly …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/05/18/tired-of-turf-try-groundcover-alternatives-instead/

    Native Shrub Option for Sandy Soils

    We often talk about sandy, nutrient poor soil in Florida and how difficult it is for growing many favorite landscape plants. Gardeners may spend considerable time and money amending soils with organic matter to improve quality. The low maintenance approach is to embrace your sandy soil and consider plants that thrive in sandy, well-drained soil. …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/03/30/native-shrub-option-for-sandy-soils/

    Florida Natives: Florida Red Anise

    Springtime brings small but very pretty red blooms on an outstanding native shrub/small tree, Florida red anise (Illicium floridanum). It occurs naturally in the wild in the central and western panhandle of Florida and west along the gulf coast into Louisiana. Its natural environment is in the understory along streams and in rich, wooded areas. …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/03/09/florida-natives-florida-red-anise/

    Acorns Abound!

    Do you have more acorns than you know what to do with? When oaks produce loads of acorns, it sometimes is called a “mast” year. Do you remember the oak tree pollen and all those catkins that fell from oaks earlier in spring? Catkins are the male flowers in oaks. Some people refer to them …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/01/26/acorns-abound/

    What Plant is This?

    A common diagnostic service offered at your local UF/IFAS Extension office is plant identification. Whether you need a persistent weed identified so you can implement a management program or you need to identify an ornamental plant and get care recommendations, we can help! In the past, we were reliant on people to bring a sample …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/01/17/what-plant-is-this/

    American Beech–an American Beauty

    During a recent hike through wooded property in Walton County, our Florida Master Naturalist class came across a stunning example of an American Beech tree (Fagus grandifolia). As we looked closely at its thick, sinewy trunk (often compared to an elephant’s skin), the bark changed hues from a deep red to silvery gray and brown. …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2016/11/22/american-beech-an-american-beauty/

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