In this Issue:
  • Native Fall Wildflowers
  • Heating up with Hardy Hibiscus
  • Summer Is Time For Pollinators
  • So Many Irises for the Florida Garden
  • A Wildflower Among Weeds
  • Florida Wildflowers: Lyreleaf Sage
  • A Ghost in the Woods
  • Time to Cut Back Tropical Milkweed
  • Fall Wildflowers of North Florida Roadsides
  • Golden Fall in the Panhandle
  • wildflowers

    Native Fall Wildflowers

    Each fall, nature puts on a brilliant show of color throughout the United States. As the temperatures drop, autumn encourages the “leaf peepers” to hit the road in search of the red-, yellow- and orange-colored leaves of the northern deciduous trees. In Northwest Florida the color of autumn isn’t just from trees. The reds, purples, …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/10/02/native-fall-wildflowers/

    Heating up with Hardy Hibiscus

    Each time I travel to central and south Florida and observe the wonderfully flamboyant tropical flora, I am reminded of the unique and frustrating climatic characteristics of Northwest Florida.  Our weather is tropical enough through the summer to sustain virtually everything our friends to the south grow, but winters north of the Big Bend are …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/07/03/heating-up-with-hardy-hibiscus/

    Summer Is Time For Pollinators

    National Pollinator Week is only recognized in June, but efforts to encourage pollinators shouldn’t end then. Pollination occurs when pollen grains are moved between two flowers of the same species, or within a single flower, by wind or animals that are pollinators. Successful pollination, which may require visits by multiple pollinators to a single flower, …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/06/28/summer-is-time-for-pollinators/

    So Many Irises for the Florida Garden

    Have you noticed all of the blooming irises? Their striking shapes and colors grab my attention each time. Irises are named for the Greek word for rainbow and are often called flags. Irises, both true Iris and those with iris in the common name, are not only easy on the eyes, but also easy to …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/05/04/so-many-irises-for-the-florida-garden/

    A Wildflower Among Weeds

    The change in North Florida temperatures from cooler to warmer is making many winter weeds more noticeable as they begin to flower and form seed. Not all of these plants should be considered for mowing or hand pulling. There are several wildflowers that grow in landscape beds and thinning areas of lawns and can be …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/04/09/a-wildflower-among-weeds/

    Florida Wildflowers: Lyreleaf Sage

    Spring wildflowers are popping up along our roadways and along woodland edges. One of our native perennial beauties you can enjoy right now is lyreleaf sage, Salvia lyrata, with spikes of tubular lavender flowers rising about a foot above the ground. The blooms, which occur late winter through late spring, attract bees and butterflies and …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/03/26/florida-wildflowers-lyreleaf-sage/

    A Ghost in the Woods

    Imagine you are enjoying perfect fall weather on a hike with your family, when suddenly you come upon a ghost. Translucent white, small and creeping out of the ground behind a tree, you stop and look closer to figure out what it is you’ve just seen. In such an environment, the “ghost” you might come …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2018/01/25/a-ghost-in-the-woods/

    Time to Cut Back Tropical Milkweed

    We have grown to love monarch butterflies, with their striking orange and black markings and their fascinating annual migration from southern Canada 3,000 miles south to Mexico. To help them, we have increasingly planted milkweed, the only plant on which their caterpillars will feed. In northwest Florida, the milkweed species most planted has been tropical …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/12/14/time-to-cut-back-tropical-milkweed/

    Fall Wildflowers of North Florida Roadsides

    The network of backcountry roads winding through north Florida offer pleasant views of rolling pastures, fields of cotton, old tobacco barns, and, occasionally, a scenic overlook of our local “hills”. Many of these roads follow the original trails blazed by early settlers, or even Native Americans. Traveling along these small roads during the late summer …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/10/09/summer-wildflowers-of-north-florida-roadsides/

    Golden Fall in the Panhandle

    Each fall, nature puts on a brilliant show of color throughout the United States. As the temperatures drop, autumn encourages the “leaf peepers” to hit the road in search of the red-, yellow- and orange-colored leaves of the northern deciduous trees. Here in the Florida Panhandle, fall color means wildflowers.  As one drives the roads …

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    Permanent link to this article: http://nwdistrict.ifas.ufl.edu/hort/2017/10/02/golden-fall-in-the-panhandle/

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