In this Issue:
  • The Once Mightier Ochlockonee, Dismembered by Sea Level Rise
  • Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Aucilla River Sinks Hike
  • Dirt is just dirt, or is it?
  • Swamps: Watershed or Wasteland?
  • Sinkholes in the Florida Panhandle, Facts and Resources
  • Geology

    The Once Mightier Ochlockonee, Dismembered by Sea Level Rise

    What do the Ochlockonee and Aucilla rivers have in common? Not much, it would seem, beyond the fact that both have headwaters in Georgia and flow through Florida to the Gulf of Mexico. These two rivers do share the distinction of being unusual, although they’re unusual in very different ways. The Aucilla is a blackwater stream …

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    Panhandle Outdoors LIVE – Aucilla River Sinks Hike

    A portion of the Aucilla River flows through a landscape of dramatic and unusual geologic formations. Join us for this tour to see an amazing sequence of sinks and river rises, created as the river alternately disappears into the underlying karst and resurfaces. Fringed with moss-draped trees and native palms, the sinks are pools of …

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    Dirt is just dirt, or is it?

    Many of us walk around daily and give no thought to what is under our feet. We do not consider soil a vital natural resource, but it is. And as with water and air, soil quality is very important to our society. Soils perform 6 functions in our ecosystems. First it is a medium for plant …

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    Swamps: Watershed or Wasteland?

    Recent rains have left water standing on some panhandle Florida real estate which has been dry for several years.  Ponds, natural and dug, are brimming with water reflecting the generous outpouring from the slow and wet weather system which passed listlessly over the area. The rainwater excess is also filling the natural low points known …

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    Sinkholes in the Florida Panhandle, Facts and Resources

    During our heavy March rainfall events a tiny sinkhole appeared in my yard.  While it was only 3 feet across, it was over 5 feet deep!  After reading about the various types and causes of sinkholes, I decided it was most likely a “subsidence incident” sinkhole caused from collapsed underlying organic material (perhaps an old …

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