In this Issue:
  • The Wacissa River: Clear and Wild
  • Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife
  • Florida’s Water Quality Woes
  • Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time
  • The Air Potato Challenge
  • “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya
  • Florida Master Naturalist Program
  • St. Marks River Preserve State Park
  • Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions
  • Panhandle Outdoors Water School – St. Joseph Bay
  • Panhandle Habitats

    The Wacissa River: Clear and Wild

    Being off the beaten path has many advantages. In the case of a spring-fed river, it translates to less pressure from human use and a great opportunity for those who do visit to experience the “real Florida”. The Wacissa River, located in the southern half of Jefferson County, Florida, is near the crossroads identified as …

    Continue reading »

    Mast Producing Crops for Wildlife

    It’s that time of year when landowners, hunters, and other wildlife enthusiasts begin to plan and prepare fall and winter food plots to attract wildlife like the nice buck in the photo. Annual food plots are expensive and labor intensive to plant every year and with that thought in mind, an option you may want …

    Continue reading »

    Florida’s Water Quality Woes

    Being in the panhandle of Florida you may, or may not, have heard about the water quality issues hindering the southern part of the state. Water discharged from Lake Okeechobee is full of nutrients.  These nutrients are coming from agriculture, unmaintained septic tanks, and developed landscaping – among other things.  The discharges that head east …

    Continue reading »

    Addressing Eutrophication in Florida, one watershed at a time

    Florida’s rivers, springs, wetlands, and estuaries are central features to the identity of northwest Florida. They provide a wide range of services that benefit peoples’ health and well-being in our region. They create recreational opportunities for swimmers, canoers, and kayakers; support diverse wildlife for birders and plant enthusiasts; sustain a vibrant commercial and recreational fishery …

    Continue reading »

    The Air Potato Challenge

    By L. Scott Jackson and Julie B. McConnell, UF/IFAS Extension Bay County Northwest Florida’s pristine natural world is being threaten by a group of non-native plants and animals known collectively as invasive species. Exotic invasive species originate from other continents and have adverse impacts on our native habitats and species. Many of these problem non-natives …

    Continue reading »

    “Ice Age” Tree in Peril: Florida Torreya

    Having just completed the Okaloosa/Walton Uplands Master Naturalist course, I would like to share information from the project that was presented by Ann Foley.   The Florida Torreya is the most endangered tree in North America, and perhaps the world! Less than 1% of the historical population survives. Unless something is done soon, it may …

    Continue reading »

    Florida Master Naturalist Program

    The Florida Master Naturalist Program is an adult education University of Florida/IFAS Extension program. Training will benefit persons interested in learning more about Florida’s environment or wishing to increase their knowledge for use in education programs as volunteers, employees, ecotourism guides, and others. Through classroom, field trip, and practical experience, each module provides instruction on the …

    Continue reading »

    St. Marks River Preserve State Park

    Located along the banks of the St. Marks River’s headwaters, this park offers an extensive system of trails for hiking, horseback riding, and off-road bicycling.  The existing road network in the park takes visitors through upland pine forests, hardwood thickets and natural plant communities along the northern banks of the river. The St. Marks River …

    Continue reading »

    Coastal Erosion–a problem with new solutions

    Life on the coast has tremendous benefits; steady sea breezes, gorgeous beaches, plentiful fishing and paddling opportunities. Nevertheless, there are definite downsides to living along it, too. Besides storms like Hurricane Harvey making semi-regular appearances, our proximity to the water can make us more vulnerable to flooding and waterborne hazards ranging from bacteria to jellyfish. …

    Continue reading »

    Panhandle Outdoors Water School – St. Joseph Bay

    Our first POL program will happen this week – August 17 – at the Navarre Beach snorkel reef, and is sold out!  We are glad you all are interested in these programs.   Well!  We have another one for you.  The Natural Resource Extension Agents from UF IFAS Extension will be holding a two-day water school at …

    Continue reading »

    Older posts «