Tag Archive: panhandle

Be Beach Aware with Jellyfish Out There

Summertime and swimming at the beach just go together naturally in Florida with our state’s more than 1,000 miles of coastline. Many fond memories are created along these salty margins and the Panhandle region of the state has some of the top-rated beaches in the world. It is a great place to experience a relaxing, …

Continue reading »

NISAW 2016 – An Update on the Lionfish Situation in the Panhandle

Lionfish (Pterois volitans):   An Update on the Lionfish Situation in the Panhandle In the past couple of years, we have posted articles about the lionfish during NISAW week.  A question we hear more now is – “how is lionfish management going?” First, they are still here… Wish I could say otherwise, but they are …

Continue reading »

From Fear to Fascination: White Sharks in the Panhandle

From Fear to Fascination: White Sharks in the Florida Panhandle UF/IFAS Extension – Florida Sea Grant  By Rick O’Connor (Escambia County) and L. Scott Jackson (Bay County) Recently, I was walking on our local Gulf fishing pier checking fishing line recycle bins. You can’t walk on a Gulf pier without looking over to possibly catch …

Continue reading »

Invasive of the Day (March 7th): Eurasean Milfoil, Tiger Prawn, Cuban Treefrog

March 7th: Eurasian Milfoil (Myriophyllum spicatum), Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon), The Cuban Tree Frog (Osteopilus septentrionalis)   Eurasian Water Milfoil: Eurasian water milfoil is a submerged aquatic plant that can be found in northwest Florida in lakes, rivers, and coastal marshes. Water milfoil forms a dense mat of vegetation that can block sunlight and habitat …

Continue reading »

Invasive Species of the Day (March 6th): Climbing Ferns & Chinese Privet

March 6th: Climbing Ferns (Lygodium sp.) & Chinese Privet (Ligustrum sinense) Japanese Climbing Fern (Lygodium japonicum) and Old World Climbing Ferns (Lygodium microphyllum): are presently the only non-native invasive ferns in Florida.  Both ferns reproduce and spread readily by wind-blown spores. A single fertile leaflet can produce 28,600 spores.  Animals, equipment, and even people that …

Continue reading »

Invasive Species of the Day (March 4th): Benghal Dayflower, Chinese Tallow, Water Hyacinth

March 4th: Benghal Dayflower (Commelina benghalensis), Chinese Tallow (Sapium sebiferum), & Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes):   Benghal Dayflower (Commelina benghalensis): Also called Tropical spiderwort, is an invasive weed that creeps into nurseries, lawns, pastures and crop fields.  It was first observed in the early 1990’s in Florida but can now be found throughout the panhandle …

Continue reading »

Improving Water Quality and Bringing Back the Bayous

Those who have lived in the Panhandle area for many years will remember the days when our local bayous were places people water skied, kids learned to swim, and fishermen brought home plenty of speckled trout.  But today we see little of this.  Water quality within our bayous has declined to a point that the …

Continue reading »

Invasive Species of the Day Series (March 10th): Palmer Amaranth & Nutria

National Invasive Species Awareness Week: March 3rd – March 8th March 10th: Palmer Amaranth (Palmer amaranth) & Nutria (Myocastor coypus):   Palmer Amaranth: Palmer Amaranth, a type of pigweed, is invading the Southeast.  It is a very troublesome weed for us because it is fast growing, produces a lot of seed and easily develops herbicide …

Continue reading »

Invasive Species of the Day Series (March 9th): Mimosa Tree & Eurasian Water Milfoil

Mimosa Tree: When traveling down secluded roads, one always marvels at the beautiful fragrant puff-like flowers lining the right of way. Many people decide that they must have one for their yard. Unfortunately, obtaining one for landscaping purposes is a bad decision. This tree is a Mimosa, Albizia julibrissin, and is famous for the ability to thrive …

Continue reading »

Diamonds in the Marsh

It is hard to say one turtle is more beautiful than another but this is one beautiful turtle!  The diamondback terrapin is the only brackish water turtle in the United  States. These turtles can be easily distinguished from other species by their light colored skin with dark spots, and their choice of habitat – salt marshes. …

Continue reading »

Older posts «